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Vinaigrette Varieties

 

vinaigrette varieties

vinaigrette varieties

Salad season made an early start in Brisbane this year. The temperature began to rise as soon as the calendar flipped over to September 1st.

We eat salads most days, leafy salad greens dressed directly in the bowl with a generous pinch of sea salt flakes, a good grinding of black pepper, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and either lemon juice or a wine vinegar. Preparation takes no time at all.

From the dark depths of my memory bank I recall advise from an unknown source that a perfectly balanced vinaigrette is mixed in the proportion of 1/3 acid to the measure of oil.  That simple formula has never let me down.

For variety though I have a few more complex salad dressing that I make, vinaigrettes that tie the salad vegetables to the flavour profile of the food it accompanies, vinaigrettes with bold flavours that make the salad the main meal and others that I make just for fun and variety. These dressings require only a few minutes work, they store well in the fridge and are far better than anything you can buy. Simply give the storage jar a good shake before using.

With these simple foolproof vinaigrette recipes I have no need for commercial dressings. The flavour of good oil, the nuance of different vinegars and controlled level of sweetness make these salad dressing a stand out.

Mustard and Horseradish Vinaigrette – for potato salad

1 heaped teaspoon of grainy mustard

1 heaped teaspoon of prepared horseradish

1 tablespoon of tarragon vinegar

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt flakes and a good grinding of black pepper

Whisk together the mustard, horseradish and vinegar. Slowly whisk in the olive oil and continue whisking until the dressing emulsifies. Whisk through the seasonings.

Use to dress hot steamed potatoes for salad.

Allow to cool a little then toss in some through chopped parsley and snipped chives,

Keep dressing in a screw topped jar in the fridge.

 

Lemon Poppyseed Vinaigrette – a good all rounder

1/4 cup maple syrup

2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons champagne  vinegar

1 1/2 tablespoons poppy seeds

1 teaspoon dry mustard powder

1 tablespoon mayonnaise (adds a touch of creaminess)

1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

2/3 cup olive oil

sea salt and black pepper to taste

Whisk together everything except the oil and seasoning. Gradually whisk in the oil.

Season to taste.

Store in a screw topped jar in the fridge.

 

Pickled Ginger Vinaigrette  – for Asian style vegetable salads, cold noodles, poke bowls and don buri

1 tablespoon pickled ginger, finely minced

2 tablespoons pickled ginger liquid

1 tablespoons tamari

1 teaspoon wasabi, powder or paste

1 teaspoons sesame oil

1/2 cup peanut oil

sea salt to taste

Whisk all the ingredients together then adjust seasoning.

Store in a screw topped jar in the fridge.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

29 comments on “Vinaigrette Varieties

  1. Mae
    November 2, 2017

    It’s challenging to understand why anyone buys bottled salad dressing!

    Poke bowls are kind of a fad in the US right now — some specialized restaurants are dedicated to them, and allow the customers to specify ingredients from a sort of salad bar combined to their taste.

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 2, 2017

      Poke bowl are becoming very popular here, it’s a great way to feed picky people and having a good dressing really helps

      Like

  2. fergie51
    November 1, 2017

    Thank you, I may just print these or write down and stick on the fridge as I always leave it to last minute and resort to oil and lemon juice. Nice having a bit of extra zing!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 2, 2017

      Oil and lemon is my fallback too but you’re right, it’s nice to have some extra zing. Enjoy…

      Like

  3. chefkreso
    October 29, 2017

    That mustard horseradish one sounds like a winner!

    Like

  4. Lisa @ cheergerm
    October 28, 2017

    Bloody good idea, I always make it up on the spot but will get myself sorted.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 29, 2017

      Each time I stock the fridge with ready mades they disappear in a flash. It’s worth the effort..

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Debi @ An Evolving Life
    October 27, 2017

    Oh my, that mustard horseradish dressing for potato salad sounds divine! Winter is real green salad (and cabbage) season here in Greece. It is too hot in the summer to grow lettuces and similar greens, so they rely on tomato/cucumber combinations. Hmmm… wonder how that lemon poppyseed dressing would taste like with finely shredded cabbage and carrots…

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 27, 2017

      The poppyseed dressing is excellent with both cabbage and carrot. I’d love to hear what you think of the potato salad vinaigrette, I think it’s so good I’ve totally given up using mayonnaise.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Eha
    October 27, 2017

    Oh, I manage to eat salads almost all year! Methinks there is a commercial bottle of dressing somewhere at the back of the fridge but . . . almost always make my own in the style most have suggested here . . . and your current post is worth a mint as all your ‘vinaigrettes’ will be happily tested and join that ‘special’ pile in the kitchen!!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 27, 2017

      Thanks Eha, enjoy. Hopefully someone who relies on commercial dressing might have the courage to to try making their own..

      Like

  7. marymtf
    October 27, 2017

    I think that one of these days you’re going to put together a book about your catering experiences and recipes. I’m going to be first in line for a copy.

    Like

  8. chef mimi
    October 27, 2017

    Wonderful recipes! I’ve actually taught classes in making vinaigrettes. I don’t have any idea why anyone would buy them! They’re disgusting! I use more of a 50-50 mixture, only because I really like vinegar!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 27, 2017

      Such a fundamental kitchen skill, an under rated skill at that. Of course once you know how you can tweak to suit your taste

      Like

      • chef mimi
        October 31, 2017

        Absolutely! So important, so much less expensive, so much better than store-bought, and truly so much fun to create!

        Like

  9. foodies
    October 27, 2017

    hi i like to make my own dressing going to try soon

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 27, 2017

      Once you’ve made your own there’s no going back to the stuff from the supermarket

      Like

  10. Linda Duffin
    October 27, 2017

    I like all of those … great share, Sandra, thank you.

    Like

  11. Megala
    October 26, 2017

    Great share, thanks !!

    Like

  12. Francesca
    October 26, 2017

    Some very tasty dressings here Sandra. I’m a rub the bowl with a garlic clove, salt flakes, olive oil and a dash of vinegar mostly, though a well composed dressing makes a lovely change. Must try the poppy seed dressing.

    Like

  13. Ron
    October 26, 2017

    We also prefer to make our own salad dressings as it’s thrifty and they taste better. Your Mustard and Horseradish Vinaigrette is right up my alley. I’m trying it on a warm potato salad served on top of fresh arugula. Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Jan
    October 26, 2017

    I love imaginative salads and dressings and these sound very good. What’s a poke bowl, Sandra?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 26, 2017

      Thanks Jan. A poke bowl is Hawiian in origin. It’s like a composed salad in a bowl sitting on top of a bed of rice

      Like

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