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Pickled Ginger

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The versatility of ginger makes it THE most useful aromatic in my kitchen. Dried, ground and combined with deep earthy sweetness of molasses, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg I use it to adds depth and bite to sweet pastries. Both candied and preserved ginger add zing and zest to desserts, but it’s equally good chocolate coated for a luxury treat. Ginger beer, ginger wine, ginger cordial, ginger tisane, ginger jam and marmalade, the flavour of ginger is a loved universally.

Asian cuisines use ginger combined with chilli, garlic, lemongrass, coriander root, lime leaf, spring onion and salty sauces as the base cooking medium for stir fried, curries, braises and simple steamed dishes. Ginger can be used subtly to add a general depth of flavour to other ingredients, but when used generously, ginger’s assertive perfumed notes ask to be noticed.

Sashimi and sushi seem incomplete to me without a garnish of pickled ginger. The commercial pink variety of pickled ginger is commonly available in Australia. Very young ginger will turn pink when it comes into contact with the pickling liquid but the commercial product is artificially coloured and very, very sweet.

Ginger is very simple to pickle and keeps indefinitely. I use it a lot in summer, not only for sushi and sashimi, but in fresh crunchy vegetable salads, to add interest to poached chicken, smoked trout and salmon, with cucumber and daikon, soba noodles and sesame. The remaining liquid can be used to dress salad with an Asian influence.

When pickling ginger, for more enjoyable eating, choose ginger that is young, before it becomes fibrous and hot.

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250g fresh young ginger
2 level teaspoons sea salt
1/2 cup rice vinegar
1/2 cup filtered water
1/2 cup white caster sugar

Choose a jar with a plastic lined lid of approx 500ml capacity.
Wash the jar and lid in hot soapy water. Put the hot wet jar in the oven at 120C for 30 minutes.
Peel the ginger with a paring knife, then using a mandolin, finely cut it across the fibre into very thin slices.
Put the ginger into a non reactive bowl, sprinkle it with the salt and allow to rest for 30 minutes. The salt will draw out excess moisture.
Combine the rice vinegar, sugar and water in a small pot.
Warm the mixture over a low heat, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved.
Increase the heat, bring the solution to the boil then turn off the heat immediately.
Drain the ginger, squeezing it gently with your hands, then tip the ginger into the vinegar.
Stir the ginger around a few times using tongs to dissolve the salt. Pack the ginger slices into the hot jar.
Pour the hot vinegar over the top then seal immediately. A vacuum will form as the ginger cools.
Invert the jar a few times to remove any air bubbles.
Refrigerate when cold.
The pickled ginger will be ready in 24 hours and once opened, will keep for a couple of months in the fridge.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

22 comments on “Pickled Ginger

  1. Pingback: In My Kitchen December 2015 | Please Pass the Recipe

  2. bebs1
    October 19, 2014

    I love pickled ginger when I order sushi and sashimi at the Japanese restaurants. It is hard to find young ginger in our grocery stores here so you just gave me the idea of planting them next year. Thanks!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 19, 2014

      I hope ginger grows well for you Bebs, because home pickled ginger is wonderful

      Like

  3. Pingback: In My October Kitchen | Please Pass the Recipe

  4. StefanGourmet
    September 20, 2014

    Great, now I’ll have to make my own pickled ginger next time I make sushi 😉 Thx for sharing!

    Like

  5. Michelle
    September 19, 2014

    We just bought some of the most gorgeous young ginger at a farmers’ market a few days ago. So, your timing was perfect!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 19, 2014

      Ginger is beautiful when it has pink tips, it’s the best time to make pickle with it Michelle, enjoy……

      Like

  6. My Kitchen Witch
    September 19, 2014

    What a wonderful way to preserve ginger – sweet, sour and spicy all in one. I’ve do e something like this in small batches, but your idea of creating a vacuum seal is a great idea.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 19, 2014

      It didn’t stay sealed for long! We get through a batch this size in a month in the warmer seasons

      Like

  7. My French Heaven
    September 19, 2014

    I always have some in the cupboard. Nice post my dear!!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 19, 2014

      Thanks Stephane. Last night I added a generous amount of finely shredded pickled ginger to a slaw made with Asian greens. It was wonderful….

      Like

  8. Helen C
    September 19, 2014

    I feel lucky. The first recipe I received is one of my favorite food. Thank you! (I should come earlier!) Have a great day! Helen

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 19, 2014

      Happy luck Helen, and thanks for following. I really enjoy your photos

      Like

  9. Glenda
    September 19, 2014

    Hi Sandra, I love this recipe as I love ginger. I will be keeping this one. Thanks

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 19, 2014

      I hope you make a batch of pickled ginger Glenda, I think you’ll like it

      Like

  10. Karen
    September 19, 2014

    I love pickled ginger but never thought to make my own. Thanks for the inspiration.

    Like

  11. marymtf
    September 18, 2014

    I use ginger in so many dishes. Love your recipe, Sandra.

    Like

  12. Francesca
    September 18, 2014

    What a special recipe, this one I will not only keep but pass on to my daughter, the Sushi Queen. I recently dragged out my mandolin, doing something fancy to fennel, and ended up sli ing the top of my thumb. I’m now looking for a safer model.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 18, 2014

      I think all mandolins are dangerous! Try some homemade pickled ginger, you won’t be sorry, but take care with your finger tips!

      Like

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This entry was posted on September 18, 2014 by in FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Pantry Essentials, Pickles & Chutneys, Preserves, Side Dishes & Salads and tagged , .
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