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Oat and Walnut Crackers

 We fell head over heels in love with oat crackers while in New Zealand, not traditional Scottish Oatcakes which we treat like old friends but sassy crunchy crackers with nuts. First the walnut variety caught our attention, then the hazelnut. Crisp bites with a hint of salt and a nuance of sweetness, these crackers were a moreish pop in the mouth snack and the perfect complement to delicious Kiwi cheese.

Made locally and available at all self respecting food stores in New Zealand, we vowed life long loyalty to these delicious morsels, until we discovered after returning to Oz that the only online supplier here charged twice the $$ we had paid in NZ. If you see Oat Crackers made by 180 degrees, grab them, youโ€™re in for a treat.

Meanwhile I set about recreating the walnut variety based on the ingredient list on the side of the package: oats, walnuts, butter, tapioca flour, salt, sugar and bicarbonate of soda. I had successfully made oatcakes before so I simply messed together my recipe with the ingredient list off the package. The flavour was good, but the bite all wrong. Too much tapioca flour I think.

I decided to fly by the set of my pants with the next attempt. Again the flavour was good, but the crackers were too short, too crumbly. I think in all honesty I over processed the walnuts and made the oils run, carelessness on my part. This dough is much better made by hand.

With a sense of oatcake deja vu (it too 3 attempts to get them right) I tried again, determined to nail a reasonable facsimile of the real thing before I forgot what I was aiming for.

Success!

Oat and Walnut Crackers

110g Rolled Oats

75g Shelled Walnuts

40g Unsalted Butter

125mls boiling water

30g Tapioca Flour

1 teaspoon Sea Salt

1 tablespoon Brown Sugar

1 teaspoon Baking Powder

Gluten Free plain flour for dusting the bench and rolling pin.

Preheat the oven to 170C.

Line 2 oven trays with baking paper.

Process the rolled oats to a fine floury meal then transfer to a mixing bowl.

Process the walnuts until very finely chopped, but stop before the oil runs from them. Add to the oatmeal.

Add the tapioca flour, salt, sugar and baking powder and mix thoroughly.

Chop the butter into small pieces then pour the boiling water over. Stir until the butter has melted, then tip into the dry ingredients.

Mix until thoroughly combined and the mixture forms a ball. Use a pastry scraper to draw all the dough into a ball. The dough will be quite sticky.

Cover the dough and set aside to rest for at least 30 minutes.

The oats will absorb the moisture.

Using gluten free flour, dust the bench.

Cut the dough in half, then roll one piece out until it is 3-4mm thick.

Use a fluted cookie cutter to cut the dough into circles.

Lift the cut pieces onto the paper lined tray with a spatula. The crackers can be placed quite close together on the tray, they will not spread.

Repeat with the second half of the dough, then repeat these steps with the rerolled trimmings.

Bake for approx 20 minutes or until golden brown.

Makes approx 40 yummy walnut oat crackers.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

62 comments on “Oat and Walnut Crackers

  1. Heather
    March 4, 2017

    I have just returned from NZ and loved the walnut and oat crackers. We were having guests tonight and I wanted to create a similar biscuit. Found your site and made them. I used cornflour instead of tapioca flour and they were perfect. I got compliments all round and hubby said “you won’t ever need to buy cheese crackers again”. Thanks for creating this recipe and sharing it.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 4, 2017

      So glad you had success with and enjoyed my oat and walnut crackers Heather, it gives me quite a buzz to get feeback

      Like

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  3. Elly
    January 19, 2017

    Hi ladyredspecs! Thanks so much for creating this recipe. I live in NZ and just can’t justify the cost of my 180 degrees cracker addiction. I had decided to try to make some oat cakes as close as I could to the original recipe, so was stoked to see that someone had got there first!

    I thought I should let you and your readers know that these can be made dairy free – my son is lactose intolerant, so it’s always nice to adapt recipes so he can try them. I also don’t have tapioca flour on tap, so a friend suggested swapping it for cornflour/cornstarch, which is a staple in my pantry.

    I substituted the ingredients precisely: 40g of dairy-free margarine (I used olivite for any Kiwis reading this), and 30g Edmonds cornflour.

    I also was a bit cautious about the boiling water – not wanting to make the margarine oily, as can happen when it melts – so I used recently boiled water instead of completely boiled. The dough was a bit soft, as you explain in a comment above, but to compensate, I used sufficient flour under/over the dough as I rolled it to stop it sticking and baked it for about 40 minutes at 145 degrees C in a fan oven.

    These seriously rival the original – I have a packet open as a comparison ๐Ÿ™‚ – and my son has already started pulling the oat cakes off the baking rack!

    Thanks again!!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      January 19, 2017

      It’s always nice to get positive feedback Elly, thank you. I’m thrilled when a recipe converts successfully to suit an individual’s needs too, that’s what cooking is all about. ๐Ÿ˜€

      Like

  4. Jude
    January 7, 2017

    We live in an area famous for walnuts, so I’m going to have to give this recipe a try!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      January 8, 2017

      It’s the most popular recipe on my whole blog Jude, I hope you enjoy them. Nothing bears fresh walnuts!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jude
        January 9, 2017

        Will get hubby to start cracking!!๐Ÿ˜

        Like

  5. Jenny Auld
    November 18, 2016

    Hi, I am loving the ‘chilli’ flavour ones which on the 180 packet says “made with oats and almonds”..
    Have you tried making with almonds instead of walnuts? Do you think would be same quantities or do differently pls ?
    Jenny

    (Packet says Almonds(12%) and Chilli Powder(0.3%)

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 18, 2016

      Hi Jenny, Almonds are not as oily as walnuts so you may need to increase the butter content a little to compensate. I haven’t tried it myself. You can calculate a pretty accurate recipe if the % of each ingredient is given, but be prepared to make a couple of batches to get it right, baking in the domestic enviroment differs enormously from the commercial

      Like

  6. Bonnie
    August 25, 2016

    I also feel in love with the oat crackers on our tour of New Zealand in November 2015. Since I do not eat wheat, these were a wonderful discovery. Very disappointing to find that they are not available here in Canada or anywhere close. I can’t believe I ran across this link for the recipe. Thank you so much for recreating and sharing. I made these last weekend and my guests all thought they were wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Bonnie
    August 19, 2016

    This is so wonderful. We are from Canada and traveled New Zealand from North to South in November 2015. I do not eat wheat and when I found these oat crackers in a little shop in Akaroa I fell in love. I contacted 180 Degrees to see if they export to Canada but no luck. These are truly the best crackers ever and I will attempt to make them from your recipe. Thanks so much for publishing this.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 19, 2016

      It’s a pretty straight forward recipe Bonnie, I hope it satisfies your love memory from NZ

      Like

  8. ann wadworth
    August 14, 2016

    i had exactly the same thoughts as you about the yummy bicuits and went out and got some tapioca flour, we grow our own hazelnuts and walnuts. so finding your recipe of how to put the ingredients together is fantastic, i just made some and they are really good. Thanks so much!!!! if you are ever in queenstown nz look me up Ann
    ph 02040390865

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 14, 2016

      Thanks you so much Ann, getting lovely feedback makes blogging very gratifying.

      Like

  9. Zoe
    August 11, 2016

    Hi – I adore the 180deg oat biscuits, and I’m super keen to give your recipe a go – but I prefer the nutless varieties .. Do you have any advice as to how to modify oat/flour/fat ratios when going nutless? I’d hate to balls up my first attempt ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 11, 2016

      Hi Zoe, the link will take you to a nutless oatcake recipe, hope that helps. ๐Ÿ˜€. https://pleasepasstherecipe.com/2014/06/12/pure-and-simple-natural-savoury-oatcakes/

      Like

      • Zoรซ
        August 24, 2016

        Hi again – thanks so much for your reply! I tried a couple of modifications (basically just increasing the amount of oats), and found that 130g of oats (without nuts) seems to work just fine. I tried 110g – and while they were delicious, there was perhaps too high a butter to oat ratio. 150g also yielded good results, but then, not quite buttery enough (you see, it’s the magic combination of oats and butter that really make these crackers pop, I think!) .. So – 130g of oats, and everything else as is in your recipe. Also, maybe my oven is a bit weak, but I had to bake them fan-forced for about 35 mins before they started to change colour ..

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        August 24, 2016

        Thanks for that Zoe, it’s good to know, glad you cracked the magic formula. Cheers, Sandra

        Like

  10. Ewan
    June 7, 2016

    You rock! I’m addicted to the store bought version. I just made your recipe and am delighted with the result.
    May add a few flavour options like rosemary or paprika.
    Thanks

    Like

  11. Akila
    March 30, 2016

    I made these second time… But this time they are too crumbly… I substituted tapioca flour with rice flour and butter with coconut oil… What could I be doing wrong? They taste quiet delicious though!!!

    Like

  12. Akila
    March 30, 2016

    I just made them a second time but this time they are too crumbly….I substituted tapioca flour with rice flour since I didnt have tapioca flour….and butter with coconut oil…the first time around they weren’t crisp and aging slightly crumbly…. What could I be doing wrong? They taste quiet delicious though.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 30, 2016

      OK lets talk about the recipe as written first. It’s important to make a fine, flour like meal with the oats and walnuts, it’s also vital that you don’t substitute the boiling water with hot water from the tap as you need the oats to absorb a maximum amount so they become pliable. The resting period is important for this reason. If you follow that exactly and then bake the crackers until they are golden brown, they should work. Of course you must consider different brands of the same ingredient are never exactly the same. Rice flour will also absorb water, while tapioca, like maize flour is more like glue so rice flour and tapioca flour are not interchangeable. Coconut oil lacks the watery buttermilk component of butter. Using a direct swap of quantities in these biscuits firstly reduces the amount of liquid and actually increases the amount of fat. I hope that helps you understand why your second batch of crackers are crumbly.

      Like

  13. Rachel
    March 6, 2016

    I just made these with gluten free flour, they are DELICIOUS!!!! Thank you for creating/sharing this recipe!
    Took awhile for mine to crisp up (we moved to a new house with new oven though, have to learn it’s heat level!), next time I might do fan-forced.
    They taste so similar to those 180 crackers! I made a double batch so my efforts would be rewarded for awhile longer.
    I also just cut them into squares with a knife instead of cutting out circles.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 6, 2016

      Hi Rachel, I’m glad my walnut oat crackers recipe was a success for you. Enjoy…

      Like

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  15. Michelle
    December 14, 2015

    Do you think it would be ok to freeze the mixture? Am exciting about making them for Christmas. Cheers.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      December 14, 2015

      I haven’t tried freezing the mixture Michelle, but i don’t anticipate there would be any problem. There’s nothing in them that would go watery…

      Like

  16. gwyncurbygodwin
    December 7, 2015

    Sounds yummy.

    Like

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  18. Harriet
    November 16, 2015

    Hummmmm just followed the recipe and the mixture looks like very sloppy porridge – is this right?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 16, 2015

      No, not at all. Did you process the oats until they were fine and flour like?

      Like

  19. MrsC (Maryanne)
    November 8, 2015

    I LIVE here in NZ but I can’t help myself wanting to make my own and was looking for an oatcake recipe to kick off the hazelnut version of these oat cakes and found this! Poor 180, having to publish their ingredients lists hehe. But the weeky shopping bill couldn’t sustain $5.87 a time. I am resting the dough and have two kinds of cheese all ready to try them afterwards. Thank you!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 8, 2015

      You’re most welcome. They are $8-$9 here in Oz, ouch! Enjoy….

      Like

  20. Guru Ted
    August 26, 2015

    Ha! I wanted to make these crackers so I googled the ingredients from the 180 degrees pack and it landed me on this page. This will save me a lot of time and effort. Thanks. Is it an Australian tablespoon or a Kiwi one? I.e is it 4 teaspoons or 3 teaspoons.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 26, 2015

      G’day Ted. There are 4 tsps to my tablespoon. We love everything about the 180degree oat and walnut crackers except the price. This recipe isn’t an exact likeness, but it ain’t half bad. Good luck!

      Like

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  23. Francesca
    May 19, 2015

    Wow, Sandra! They look fantastic! And that rack? Even cuter than the first time I saw it! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 19, 2015

      Gee thanks Francesca, i was really happy with these crackers. I love the rack too…

      Like

  24. I am SO making these – I love this brand and *may* have brought 6 packets of their biscuits home with me when I was in NZ last year. I buy them occasionally here but they are so $$$!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 19, 2015

      So Mel, you know how good 180 degrees are, this recipe is a reasonable facsimile, enjoy….

      Like

  25. Gather and Graze
    May 15, 2015

    I found them at my local IGA this morning Sandra and you’re right, they’re not the cheapest cracker on the shelf! ๐Ÿ˜‰ Couldn’t help myself though and bought a pack just to experience themโ€ฆ I’ve had a cold all this week, so haven’t felt much like cooking lately – nice to have a little treat to help me get better!

    Liked by 1 person

    • ladyredspecs
      May 15, 2015

      Hope you’re feeling a little less congested Margot, and also I hope the enjoyment factor was worth the outlay for the 180 degrees bikkies, we love them!

      Like

  26. tinywhitecottage
    May 15, 2015

    I keep telling myself I need to start making our crackers. It certainly would be nice knowing exactly what is in them! Lovely recipe Sandra. I imagine homemade crackers taste so much better than store bought!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 19, 2015

      The production of palm oil is such an enormous enviromental issue I actively steer clear of any products that include it. Unfortunately crackers are high on the list! There are a few varieties available that specify they are made with better alternatives, but making your own is by far the best way to go. These are delicious!

      Like

  27. Serena @ foodfulife
    May 14, 2015

    Absolutely delicious!!… I’d love some right now! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

  28. thehungrymum
    May 14, 2015

    Oat crackers are an NZ thing?! They certainly haven’t made their way over to Oz! I need to start making my own crackers – I buy packets of the things each week but it is so hard finding them without palm oil.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 14, 2015

      I have recipes a couple of oat cracker recipes on my site, but there are many delicious simple recipes out there.

      Like

  29. MamaD1xx4xy
    May 14, 2015

    Sounds great. Could I swap out the walnuts for hazelnuts and still get similar results? Walnuts are my least favorite nut!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 14, 2015

      There was a hazelnut variety of this biscuit too, very yummy. You might need to add a little more liquid, hazels are less oily but the flavour would be great.

      Like

  30. I love how you started with your tried-and-true oat cake recipe (which are delicious!). The addition of the nuts is a brilliant idea. Does the tapioca flour add to the flavour and does it help to keep the ingredients “cohesive”? I wonder if one could substitute another starch – potato starch or corn flour or arrowroot?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 14, 2015

      Yes I think the tapioca flour is for glue. i think any flour would be OK, the amount as the is minimal.

      Like

      • Just gave the recipe another read through. Are you missing the 125ml water in the ingredient list? Compared this with your original oatcake recipe… Really need to try this with hazelnuts (my altime favourite nut).

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        May 15, 2015

        Ooo so sorry, you’re right I did miss the water. All fixed, thanks….

        Liked by 1 person

  31. Tapioca flour a brilliant thought! This recipe looks so good to me. Imagine how delicious with a great blue cheese. Bookmarking.

    Like

  32. StefanGourmet
    May 14, 2015

    Great that you succeeded to recreate them. Is the oven fan forced or not?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 14, 2015

      I left the fan on, but either way would be OK! it’s important they are toasty brown when done so they are crisp

      Like

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This entry was posted on May 14, 2015 by in Baking, FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Gluten free baking, Savoury Baking, Snacks and tagged , , , , .
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