Please Pass the Recipe

from one generation to the next

Charmaine Solomon’s Squid Curry and Green Bean Sambal

20140205-130744.jpg

This month, the Cookbook Guru hosted by Leah is exploring Charmaine Solomon’s Complete Asian Cookbook.

Charmaine and I go back a long way. My edition of her “Complete Asian Cookbook” dates from 1988, and it was with her guidance that I began to experiment making real Indian food incorporating whole spices.

I’m going to sound like your Grandma when I explain that in 1988, the spice section of the major local supermarkets comprised those few ground varieties needed to make English style cakes and puddings and coconut milk was an ingredient you made by soaking desiccated coconut in boiling water before squeezing out as much flavour as you could. Not deterred by these challenges, I drove around Melbourne to stock my pantry with the necessary whole spices then I began cooking from the now food splattered section of the book entitled “India & Pakistan.” The vegetable curries from those chapters remain firm family favourites.

When Leah named Charmaine Solomon’s “Complete Asian Cookbook” as this month’s Cookbook Guru, my first thought was of my old familiar friends, but in the end I decided to teleport myself to Indonesia and prepare Gulai Cumi-Cumi (squid curry) instead.

Bearing in mind the age of my edition and the fact it published at a time when fresh Asian ingredients were difficult to come by in Melbourne, I have replaced any dry ingredients with their fresh counterparts and chosen the more authentic option when substitutes are suggested.

This was an incredibly simple recipe to prepare if you disregard cleaning the squid. I could have bought ready cleaned calamari tubes but generally they have been frozen and are not to my liking.

I made a green bean sambal from the same section in the book as well, and frankly, it stole the show. We liked the squid curry though the assertive sauce overwhelmed the subtle flavour of the squid. I think prawns would have been a better choice of seafood. The beans on the other hand were smoky from the hot wok, spicy from the sambal badjak and totally delicious.

The recipes were easy to follow, simple to prepare and in 2014, all the ingredients were easily procured from my local food market. While my edition of “Charmaine Solomon’s Complete Asian Cookbook” may look dated (there’s no food porn here), the recipes are authentic and well written. The introduction to each country explains the local food culture and ingredients necessary. The glossary at the end translates the ingredients into plain English.

Charmaine Solomon was at the forefront of introducing the food of Asia to the Anglo-Australian home cook. She treated both the with respect by giving us a real insight into the authentic flavours of each of the countries she  included.

20140205-130810.jpg
Green Bean Sambal Sambal Buncis (with a few minor alterations)
250g fresh green beans
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 clove minced garlic
1 teaspoon sambal oelek or sambal badjak
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
2 spring onion, green part only, sliced

1.      Wash and trim the beans. Cut them into fine diagonal slices

2.      Heat the oil in a wok.

3.      When it begins to smoke toss in the beans and stir fry for 2 minutes.

4.      Add the garlic, salt and sambal. Cook for another 2 minutes

5.      Toss through the spring onion greens and serve immediately
Serves 4

Squid Curry Gulai CumiCumi (with a few minor alterations)

800g fresh squid
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 heaped teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 red chilli, finely sliced
1/2 teaspoon trasi, crumbled (fermented shrimp paste)
400 ml coconut milk
4 candle nuts, grated ( easy on a Microplane)
1 stalk lemon grass, finely sliced
1 teaspoon palm sugar
4 tablespoons tamarind paste
2 spring onions, green part only finely sliced
1 ripe tomato finely diced for garnish

1.      Clean the squid, cut off the head and discard but keep the tentacles. Set aside the ink sacs for another dish.

2.      Separate the wings from the body and peel the dark outer membrane from both the wings and body.

3.      Using a knife, scrape the suckers off the tentacles and peel off the dark skin.Cut the body, wings and tentacles into bite sized pieces.Refrigerate until needed.

4.      Put all the other ingredients except the tamarind, sugar and salt into a saucepan.

5.      Bring to simmering point then cook until thick, about 5 minutes.

6.      Add the squid and cook for another 5 minutes.

7.      Add the sugar, salt and tamarind. Stir to combine.

8.      Taste and add more salt if necessary.

9.      Remove from the heat, stir in the spring onion, then transfer to a serving bowl.

10.  Garnish with finely diced tomato
Serves 4

20140205-130923.jpg

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

18 comments on “Charmaine Solomon’s Squid Curry and Green Bean Sambal

  1. Pingback: Curried Chicken with Cashews | Passion Fruit Garden

  2. Transplanted Cook
    February 10, 2014

    Absolutely love squid. This recipe looks fabulous!

    Like

  3. Glenda
    February 10, 2014

    Hi Sandra. I have my mum’s South East Asian Cookbook by Charmaine Solomon which was first published in 1972. My mum had 4 cookbooks. It is interesting that one was by Charmaine Solomon. I have made the pilau from that book many, many times.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 10, 2014

      Solomon’s recipes are so good and so reliable, I think they are worth going back to time and time again!

      Like

      • Glenda
        February 10, 2014

        Hi Sandra, I have joined the cookbook guru. I am going to make one soon!!

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        February 10, 2014

        That’s great Glenda! It’s a soft challenge and fun! First spelt sourdough was a bit heavy, like 100% rye! flavour was deliciously sour. I’ve read all your sourdough posts now and feel better equipped for loaf number 2, tomorrow

        Like

      • Glenda
        February 10, 2014

        Excellent, are you going to put up a photo?

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        February 10, 2014

        Photographing the progress, might do a journey post

        Like

  4. saucygander
    February 9, 2014

    The green bean sambal looks so simple and flavoursome, would love to have it for dinner this week. I have been borrowing a friend’s copy of the book when I find a reference to a recipe on another website or blog, really should get my own copy.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 9, 2014

      You will find yourself referring to it again and again, it’s well worth the investment IMO

      Like

  5. Eha
    February 9, 2014

    [ssh!! Since I am supposed to be on a blog break for the Olympics etc!!] . . . I still use Charmaine Solomon’s bookS ALL the time! Yes, I have her first ‘Complete . . .’ also, but the one I actually use most is the 1990 ‘Complete . . .’ vegetarian one, divided into Western and Eastern fare!! SO simple, SO fantastic – I have dozens of eggplant recipes, but still make her supereasy stuffed one!! Somehow all of her cooking is exciting BUT does follow the KISS principle 🙂 !

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 9, 2014

      She’s so practical. Her simple tasty nutritious food has longevity because it has honest roots in family cooking. She doesn’t try to set trends or emulate fancy restaurants, just provide tasty meals! Three cheers for Charmaine!

      Like

  6. Leah
    February 9, 2014

    This looks amazing and sounds delicious!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 9, 2014

      The sauce overwhelmed the squid a bit, but is was nice for a change. As for the beans……YUM xx

      Like

  7. Leah
    February 9, 2014

    Reblogged this on The Cook Book Guru and commented:
    Our first contribution to this month’s The Cookbook Guru is a trip down memory lane and a visit to Indonesia from Lady Red Specs. I hope you enjoy reading about here experiences with Charmaine Solomon’s The Compelete Asian Cookbook as much as I did.

    Leah

    Like

  8. Leo Cotnoir
    February 9, 2014

    I have the 1976 edition of Solomon’s book. It is still one of my favorites.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 9, 2014

      I’m with you Leo, Charmaine is a great friend to have in the kitchen!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on February 9, 2014 by in FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Light Savoury Dishes, Main Meals, Seafood Dishes, Side Dishes & Salads and tagged , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: