Please Pass the Recipe

from one generation to the next

Grandma’s Passionfruit Flummery

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Flummery is a word you rarely hear today. It can be used in two contexts, to describe meaningless nonsense or an old style light mousse like dessert.

My Mum often made flummery when I was a child, using a packet of sweetened jelly crystals dissolved in half the prescribed water, almost set, then beaten into a can of chilled evaporated milk.

Many a time us kids were roped in to take a turn with the manual rotary beaters to relieve Mum’s aching arms, all for the sake of dessert. Mum never referred to her jelly whip as flummery though, she dubbed it “thing” preceded by the jelly flavour. Lemon thing was my favourite.

Mum’s choice of name was to avoid confusion with the delicious Passionfruit Flummery her mother, my Grandma, made from scratch, a soft marshmallowy mousse sharply flavoured with fresh passionfruit pulp. Flummery was a summertime favourite when the passionfruit vine that rambled over the tumbledown decommissioned chook shed in the backyard was heavy with ripe purple fruit. We never tired of the exotic flavour and in the time before cavernous kitchen deep freezers, all manner of ideas were used to preserve the delicious pulp for later use. I recall one method involved crushed aspirin. Strangely it did prevent fermentation.

No lactose, no fat, no gluten, low fructose, guilt free luscious dessert!

Makes 6 individual serves

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2 cups cold water
1 tablespoon corn flour
3 sheets titanium strength gelatine
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
12 passionfruits

1 Scoop the pulp from 6 of the passionfruits and strain out the seeds.
2 Soak the gelatine sheets in cold water until soft.
3 In a small pan combine the flour, sugar and water. Bring the mixture to the boil, stirring continuously.
4 Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the softened gelatine sheets. Chill the mixture until it’s just beginning to set.
5 Prepare the serving bowls by scooping the pulp of 1/2 a passionfruit into the base of each.
6 Using a whisk, whip the jelly until light and fluffy, then beat in the lemon juice and strained passionfruit juice.
7 Pour into the serving bowls and chill until set, about 2 hours.
8 Serve topped with a dollop of Greek yoghurt and the pulp of half a passionfruit.

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About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

25 comments on “Grandma’s Passionfruit Flummery

  1. restlessjo
    May 9, 2017

    It looks lovely! Reading the description put me in mind of something we used to call Angel Delight which was very rich if made with evaporated milk. 🙂 🙂

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 9, 2017

      Thanks. My Mum made whipped jelly and evaporated milk desserts too although it didn’t really have a name. This is not as light, more like a mousse

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Mary Allardyce
    April 16, 2017

    I was brought up on flummery as a kid in Australia; now I live in France and just fancied one this Easter so found your recipe. Have just made it to the whipping stage and re-read your instructions to see when to beat in the lemon juice but – no further mention of this ingredient after its listing in the ingredients … As the passionfruit available here is rather tart I don’t expect it will make a great deal of difference but just to satisfy my curiosity, when should I add it, please, for further reference?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      April 16, 2017

      Hi Mary, thanks for pointing out the error in the method, I have amended the post. The lemon juice should be beaten into the inert jelly with the passionfruit juice. Have a happy Easter

      Like

  3. maristravels
    August 13, 2016

    Hi, my Irish Mum used to make this as well but we never had a name for it, just jelly & condensed milk. Your recipe sounds great and I shall have a go – despite the high cost of passionfruit in my country.

    Like

  4. Ron Edwards
    March 6, 2016

    My mother used to make it but I have had two goes at it but it will not set as hers did not sure what I’m doing wrong I’m sure she put jelly in the mix so that is my next trick any comments please.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 6, 2016

      Hi Ron, It’s so frustrating when a recipe doesn’t work, but this one should so I suspect your gelatine is of a different strength. Does it say on your package the amount required to set 600mls of liquid? That’s the water plus the pulp. Gelatine strength is an inexplicable anomoly that causes lots of angst. I hope this helps

      Like

  5. Pingback: In My Foolish Kitchen | My Kitchen Witch

  6. saucygander
    February 9, 2014

    This sounds intriguing! Love discovering old fashioned dishes, thanks for sharing the recipe!

    Like

  7. Dolly Rubiano
    February 8, 2014

    I love gelatine desserts. I prefer the sheets to the powder form but couldn’t find any from the supermarkets here. Your flummery looks tempting!

    Like

  8. marymtf
    February 7, 2014

    PS, stressed is an understatement,

    Like

  9. marymtf
    February 7, 2014

    So that’s flummery. I’ve read about it in novels. What is ‘titanium’ gelatine? Strong stuff?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 7, 2014

      Leaf gelatine comes in gold and titanium strength. Yes the titanium is the stronger of the two. Stephanie Alexander has a wonderful explanation in her Cook’s Companion about the different sorts of gelatine and how to use and substitute them.

      Like

  10. Transplanted Cook
    February 6, 2014

    Sounds delicious! A perfect ending to a meal. A niggling in the back of my mind tells me that flummery is or was defined differently in Britain. Perhaps I need to do a bit more research into the culinary history of flummery!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 6, 2014

      Oo, I’d love to know what you discover. My Grandma was from Suffolk so I just made the assumption it had an English proviniance.

      Like

      • Transplanted Cook
        February 6, 2014

        I can sense a forthcoming post!

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        February 6, 2014

        I’ll be very curious to see what you find. I just looked in my 1907 edition of Mrs Beeton’s Good Housekeeping. Not a flummery in sight surprisingly. 😉

        Like

  11. Leah
    February 6, 2014

    Yum, this looks and sounds amazing. You talking about Nan’s thing reminds me of it. I’m sure it graced the Sunday lunch table, along with grapes in jelly, and apricots poached & crumbled. Xxx

    Like

  12. Mr Fitz
    February 6, 2014

    What a great word!! Flummery.. it look great too!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 6, 2014

      Hey Mr Fitz, flummery is sweet, light and delicious, the name is quite apt!

      Like

  13. Francesca
    February 6, 2014

    I remember the cheat’s flummery from my childhood- I loved it and we had it often during summer. I also crave for the real thing and wish my passionfruit vine would get itself together: all the flowers drop off during this heatwave.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 6, 2014

      Sadly the gardens are quite stressed from the never ending heat. I have agapanthus curling up their toes! Hopefully it will cool down soon and your passionfruit will fruit bountifully…..

      Like

  14. jessicarucks
    February 6, 2014

    yum, that looks utterly delicious

    Like

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This entry was posted on February 6, 2014 by in Desserts, FODMAP diet, Food, Fruit Desserts, Gluten Free, Light dessert and tagged , , , , , .
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