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Savoury Spelt Scone Scrolls

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It’s the fifth annual Internatioanal Scone Week in the blogoshere, hosted by the wonderful Celia at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial. Perusing the recipes that were contributed in 2012 and 2013 is an education. Who would have thought there were so many different ways to make scones! I offer up my easy mix version made with spelt flour.

Served hot from the oven these pizza scrolls, made were a big favourite when I still had a houseful of kids, quick, cheap to make and super delicious. Served with a bowl of vegetable soup, they were a standard winter Sunday night dinner.

My simple quick mix scone dough recipe is fantastic, and it’s older than me. It came to me via a dear family friend, a farm cook with a reputation for her baked goods. She taught me that the secret to success was the handle the dough to the absolute minimum, put the scones very close together on the baking tray so they are forced to rise and bake them quickly in a hot oven. Made with wheat flour this recipe produces scones that are light and fluffy, made with 100% white spelt flour, they have a heavier texture.

Rolling the scone dough with tomato, cheese and herbs before cutting and baking gives the scone some pizzazz. The savoury pull apart ring, warm from the oven will leave you salivating. It’s very hard to stop at one!
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*2 1/2 cups sifted white spelt flour, bran discarded (I throw the bran in the muesli)
5 teaspoons baking powder (in Australia, Ward’s BP, add 2 teaspoons to every cup flour)
Pinch of salt
1 cup cream (I use lactose free)
1 cup milk (I use low fat lactose free)
1 cup thick tomato passata, well seasoned
60g shredded cheese plus 30g extra
2 teaspoons of dried oregano

Preheat the oven to 200C, fan forced
Grease a 25cm ring tin or round cake tin** and line with baking paper.
Sift the flour before measuring, then sift the sifted flour, baking powder and salt into a large bowl.
Make a well in the centre, pour in the milk and cream and mix to a wet dough.
Generously flour the bench then tip the dough out of the bowl.
Pat the sticky dough into an oblong roughly 30cmX8cmX2cm.
Spread the thick tomato sauce over the scone dough, then sprinkle with shredded cheese and oregano.
Using a pastry scraper as an aid, roll the scone length ways, swiss roll style.
Cut the roll into 12X2.5cm slices then lay them cut side up around the edge of the cake tin. They should fit snuggly and be touching one another. This will force them to rise rather than spread.
Glaze the tops with a little milk and sprinkle the remaining cheese.
Bake for 20 minutes until well risen, golden brown and firm to touch.
Remove from the tin and wrap in a tea towel.
Serve warm.
Makes 12 large scrolls.
*the spelt flour and baking powder can be replaced with self raising wheat flour
**If you are using a round cake tin, put a small oven proof dish, greased on the outside in the centre space and add a cup of boiling water to it. This will keep the scrolls from spreading.
Don’t be tempted use a smaller tin and fill it with the scrolls. Those on the outside will be over- cooked before those in the centre are done.

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About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

33 comments on “Savoury Spelt Scone Scrolls

  1. Emma
    May 20, 2017

    I grew up with helping Mum to make these savoury scrolls to have with soup for weekend dinners. I was very excited when I found your spelt scroll recipe although I was extremely disappointed. It might be my spelt flour i used but the mixture was so runny that when it came to placing the scrolls into the pan they just mushed together into this blob of dough and filling. They tasted lovely but the presentationโ€‹ was disastrous. I won’t be following this recipe again I’m sorry. I feel your ratio of flour and liquid might be incorrect.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 20, 2017

      Hi Emma, I’m sorry you found my recipe difficult to manage. The flour/liquid proportions are correct as published. You will note I said the dough would be wet, that you need to flour the bench generously and that a pastry scraper is needed to help with the shaping. Don’t be deterred by challenges it’s how you become more skillful.

      Like

  2. kathryningrid
    August 20, 2014

    Sent here by the scent wafting over at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial! Back for more exploration soon! Yum!
    Kathryn

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 20, 2014

      Nice to meet you Kathryn, any friend of Celia’s is a friend of mine…

      Like

  3. sherry from sherryspickings
    August 19, 2014

    funny isn’t it? my mum taught me to be very light handed when making scones but the recipe i put up has you beating the bejabbers out of it with a rolling pin. and still they tasted pretty good.:)

    Like

  4. M
    August 18, 2014

    What a nice idea, I know my boyfriend would love this ๐Ÿ™‚
    I’m following!

    Like

  5. G’day! How delicious do these look! YUM!
    Thanks for sharing as part of Celia’s International Scone Week too!
    Cheers! Joanne

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 17, 2014

      Thanks Joanne, just heading over to Celia’s now to catch up with the scone activity. They all look amazing!

      Like

  6. Fae's Twist & Tango
    August 15, 2014

    To the best of my knowledge, I have never had spelt, and I know that it is suppose to be very good for you. Am I right? What a creative way of making savory scones. I can only imagine how good they taste. ๐Ÿ˜›

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 15, 2014

      Thanks Fae, the scones were good, they didn’t last long. Spelt is an ancient form of wheat, the grain from which modern wheat is derived. It’s better tolerated by most people than wheat, though it still has gluten. It has a nutty taste and a slightly heavier texture than wheat flour.

      Like

  7. My Kitchen Witch
    August 15, 2014

    An interesting and unusual way to make scones. I love the innovative filling and rolling. It must have been difficult not manhandling the dough too much. You are absolutely right about the light hand!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 15, 2014

      It’s funny Deb, i’ve been making these for 20+ years and never considered by scone scrolls innovative, but thanks, I’ll take the complement. According to my dear elderly friend, the origin of the recipe, there was always an abundance of cream, while butter meant work at the churn so they devised many recipe to use cream rather than butter. It’s an easy method that produces beautiful scones

      Like

  8. Sandra, what an interesting recipe! I’ve never seen scones shaped in that way before! And how intriguing that the whole meal spelt produced a lighter result than white – I’d have guessed the opposite. They look absolutely delicious!

    PS. It’s actually the 4th International Scone Week – I just didn’t do a round-up post for the first one. And it’s the 5th year we’re all baking scones in sync! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 15, 2014

      I think you misread what I’d written Celia. Your assumption is correct, spelt flour makes heavier scones than wheat flour, but still perfectly acceptable..

      Like

      • Oh I did too, I’m sorry. That’s the problem with trying to comment at 6am. ๐Ÿ™‚ That makes sense, wheat flour would make lighter scones than spelt – I’ve actually used both white spelt and wholemeal spelt, and there’s a bit of a difference between them too (I think I prefer white spelt).

        Like

  9. Jess
    August 15, 2014

    These look absolutely wonderful- great job ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  10. thecompletebook
    August 15, 2014

    I love the way these are baked and fabulous scrumptious flavours too.
    ๐Ÿ™‚ Mandy xo

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 15, 2014

      Thanks Mandy, you can spread a variety of ingredients to the centre, don’t be restricted by your imagination!

      Like

  11. Chica Andaluza
    August 15, 2014

    How clever and very original!

    Like

  12. kitchenkonfidential
    August 14, 2014

    these (and the cheese on top) are calling my name – I need to try my hand at savory scones, ASAP!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 15, 2014

      I’m not a sweet tooth, I prefer savoury scones, still simple to make AND delicious!

      Like

  13. Anne Wheaton
    August 14, 2014

    What a good idea to roll them up and encase all that delicious filling. Good job you added the instruction not to use a smaller tin as way before that I ‘d thought I could just pack them in and they’d be fine. Definitely one to try.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 14, 2014

      Thanks Anne, i hope you do give this scone recipe a try, it’s a beauty!

      Like

  14. Glenda
    August 14, 2014

    Very interesting Sandra. For some reason I think scones should be sweet. Maybe I should branch out.

    Like

  15. Francesca
    August 14, 2014

    A fascinating take on scones. Love the the technique and the added flavours. My mother says the same thing, handle very delicately, use a light hand, barely mmix etc ….. this is why I can’t make scones. Hers are too good, and, I don’t like the feel of scone dough!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      August 14, 2014

      It’s sticky stuff that’s for sure, but these are so delicious, they’re worth the few minutes of squiggy fingers!

      Like

  16. thehungrymum
    August 14, 2014

    how very delish. I have never made savoury scones but all that cheese is telling me I should…

    Like

  17. Leah
    August 14, 2014

    yum! these look fabulous xx

    Like

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This entry was posted on August 14, 2014 by in Baking, Breakfast and Brunch, FODMAP diet, Food, Light Savoury Dishes, Savoury Baking, Snacks and tagged , , , .
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