Please Pass the Recipe

from one generation to the next

Lamb Kofta and Carrot Tajine

Lamb Kofta and Carrot Tagine

Lamb Kofta and Carrot Tagine

Sometimes, when preparing posts for this blog I have little more than a delicious recipe and some enticing photos as evidence that I’ve actually cooked said recipe. I’ll sit in front of my laptop and um and ah through many ultimately deleted lines trying to compose a post.

Do my readers expect a back story to the recipe, do they expect a recipe at all? Could Please Pass The Recipe simply disappear because I was lost for words?

I can hear the disbelieving chortles from here. Those that know me well would never believe that silence is possible and I admit that generally I’m not shy of making myself heard especially if I have something significant to say.

Cooking comes to me much more naturally than writing. Cooking, along with eating is my favourite pastime. Food cooked with love always has a willing and appreciative audience, and that in itself is all the encouragement I need to keep me in the kitchen.

This dish I’ve cooked over and over and each time its a variation of the time before. With apologies to Greg Malouf I confess to having adapted, embellished, simplified and reinvented his vegetarian recipe for Carrot Tajine. Ironically this meatball version is my best effort yet.

Lamb Kofta and Carrot Tajine

for the kofta:

500g lamb mince

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon Turkish chilli flakes (pul biber)

2 teaspoons sea salt flakes

2 tablespoons dried breadcrumbs

Knead all the ingredients together with wet hands.

Roll into 3cm balls and chill until needed.

the sauce:

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon garlic infused oil

3 cm ginger root, cut into fine julienne

2 large carrots (approx 300g) grated

2 sticks of celery, finely diced

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 heaped teaspoon Turkish chilli flakes

1 tablespoon brown sugar

2 tablespoons currants

600mls vegetable stock

200g natural yoghurt

2 teaspoons cornflour

1 tablespoon finely diced preserved lemon

extra sea salt to taste

large bunch fresh coriander leaves roughly chopped

Heat the oils in a large pan.

Add the grated carrot, celery and ginger and saute over a medium heat until translucent.

Add the spices and saute briefly, then add the currants, sugar and stock.

Bring the stock to the boil, then gently slip the meatballs into the simmering pan.

Once the sauce has returned to the boil, cover the pan and reduce the heat to low.

Poach the meatballs for 30 minutes then skim off any fat that has floated to the surface of the sauce.

Mix the yoghurt and cornflour together and add it to the pan.

Increase the heat to medium and gently stir until the sauce is thick and creamy.

Stir through the preserved lemon, then adjust the seasonings.

Scatter the coriander over the surface and serve immediately with baby carrots, zucchini and couscous.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

22 comments on “Lamb Kofta and Carrot Tajine

  1. StefanGourmet
    March 14, 2018

    This looks great. I like the grated carrot in the ‘sauce’.

    Like

  2. ChgoJohn
    March 12, 2018

    Yes, I, too, know what it’s like to question whether it’s time to share a “work in progress” recipe. I’ve a few like that. Each iteration is a variation of all that came before. Even when published, I continue to “develop” the dish. I doubt, however, that any such development would be needed here, Sandra. This dish sounds perfect just as it is.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 12, 2018

      Thanks John, I’ve used and abused the original recipe, but it’s sound enough to withstand assault

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Lisa @ cheergerm
    March 11, 2018

    Thanks for keeping it real….words don’t always come easily regardless of how articulate we may appear! I will be trying this for the lads….right up their alley.

    Like

  4. Gather and Graze
    March 9, 2018

    I know exactly what you mean Sandra! My process sounds remarkably similar to your own… sometimes that final piece of the puzzle (the backstory/anecdote) comes easily and almost writes itself and at the other times it’s more of a… sit there with fingers poised on the keyboard, with the mind twisting and turning as to how to make this elegant or funny or educational… or anything just to get it done and post and get on with life! 😉
    Your koftas and tajine sound like something my family would love… can’t get enough of middle eastern spices. Enjoy your weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • ladyredspecs
      March 12, 2018

      Spot on Margot, finding a meaningful personal voice through writing is quite a challenge.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Eha
    March 9, 2018

    How absolutely wonderful and copiable! And methinks most if us want a recipe to try but also very much a personal story alongside! Was hugely amused on a well-known Sydney blog when someone with a sore head told the blogger ‘to cut the waffle and get onto the recipe’ !! And the normally peaceful readers went kind;of berserk virtually telling her to . . . well, you know!

    Liked by 1 person

    • ladyredspecs
      March 9, 2018

      I hear you Eha, and I like the personal connection of reading blogs too. I guess our audience sticks with us if they like what they see/read and will eventually move on if they become disgruntled. Having blog followers take ownership is a whole new level of loyalty 😃

      Like

      • Eha
        March 9, 2018

        Sandra – as you would well know blog followers become blog-buddies and then quietly but immutably become friends . . . that surely is the best part . . .

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Ardys
    March 9, 2018

    Your posts are so articulate and enjoyable I would never guess you sometimes are at a loss for words. The recipe sounds and looks delicious.

    Like

  7. 2020cookingadventures
    March 9, 2018

    Hi. This looks very good, will have to put it on my list to try and look forward to following more of your posts.

    Like

  8. Linda Duffin
    March 9, 2018

    My stomach is rumbling! That sounds delicious.

    Like

  9. chef mimi
    March 8, 2018

    Ah, you’re coming in to fall, aren’t you?!! This is lovely. I love that the lamb is in the form of meatballs.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 9, 2018

      This was really delicious, warm spices and lamb are delicious together

      Like

  10. Ron
    March 8, 2018

    The vast time bloggers spend gazing at their keyboards wondering what’s next is, I believe, a well keep a secret. But, then again when my blogging mind goes blank, it’s a grand time to comment on a post. So, here I am. Your adapted kofta and carrot tajine sound amazing. A must cook…

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 8, 2018

      Ah, a man in the know. Hope inspiration comes to you soon

      Like

    • Eha
      March 9, 2018

      Excuses, excuses, Ron 🙂 ! So is that the reason the promised prawn pancake recipe ex-Lund sources has not appeared in my letterbox yet ?

      Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on March 8, 2018 by in Cooking, FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Lamb, Main Meals, recipes and tagged , , , , , .
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