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Hazelnut Buckwheat Blueberry Cake

hazelnut buckwheat and blueberry cake

hazelnut buckwheat and blueberry cake

I’ve been making birthday cakes for my kids for more than four decades.

When they were little they’d spend months prior to their birth date poring over the Women’s Weekly Birthday Cake Book trying to decide what elaborate design they’d choose for their celebration cake. Their choice always entailed solid butter cake, lurid coloured icing and lots of lollies.

As they matured their tastes changed. For a few years I made strawberry cream sponge cake or berry mousse cake, flourless chocolate cake or cassata ice cream cake. As adults they prefer fruit, minimal wheat and no cream.

For a recent birthday celebration, after a lot of head scratching I decided to make a cake with blueberries.  I’d been experimenting with buckwheat flour, using it as a substitute for wheat flour, and decided that the flavour profile would be perfect with hazelnuts and so this cake came to be.

It’s a deliciously moist cake with a dense texture, even a thin slice cuts cleanly and the nutty flavour complements the blueberries beautifully.

After singing “Happy Birthday” and humouring the 2 year old by letting him blow out the candles multiple times, we enjoyed our Hazelnut, Buckwheat and Blueberry cake with blueberry compote on the side.

I suggest you eat the cake within 3 days as I noticed that the flavour of the buckwheat strengthened with time until it over took the hazelnuts.

Store in an airtight container.

Hazelnut, Buckwheat and Blueberry Cake

180g butter

150g castor sugar

2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest

4 eggs

150 buckwheat flour

1 heaped teaspoon baking powder

150g ground hazelnuts

160g thick natural yoghurt

120g frozen blueberries

Preheat the oven to 180C. Grease a 25cm ring tin and lightly dust with rice flour.

Melt the butter, and set aside to cool a little.

Use a whisk to combine the dry ingredients and lemon zest. Make a well in the centre.

Lightly whisk the eggs into the butter one at a time then whisk the yoghurt into the buttery mixture until smooth.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry then gently stir the dry until thoroughly combined. Spoon 1/3 of the batter into the base of the cake tin spreading it to the edges of the pan. Scatter over half the blueberries.

Add a second layer of batter, then the remaining berries. Top with the remaining cake batter.

Bake in the middle of the oven until the centre of the cake is cooked through when tested with a skewer, about 40 minutes.

Turn the cake out of the tin onto a rack and allow to cool.

lemon glacé icing:

3/4 cup of pure icing sugar

1-2 tablespoons of lemon juice

Sift the icing sugar to remove all the clumps.

Slowly add the lemon juice mixing as you go to make a thick viscous icing.

Pour the icing into a squirter bottle and drizzle icing over the cake.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

30 comments on “Hazelnut Buckwheat Blueberry Cake

  1. Gretchen
    December 1, 2017

    This sounds so delicious! My youngest was just going through cookbooks planning birthday cakes for the next several years!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      December 1, 2017

      One of the delights of childhood, a personal festival AKA birthday celebrations….Oh to be that young again…

      Like

  2. Sumith
    November 29, 2017

    The cake looks delicious and moist. And a great capture too!

    Like

  3. Lisa @ cheergerm
    November 28, 2017

    I am late to the party but am adding this cake to my ‘to bake’ list. Looks fab. Have great memories of the good ole Womens Weekly cake book, what an icon it is.

    Like

  4. Tracey O'Brien
    November 25, 2017

    I love the sound of this combination, Sandra. So interesting. Will have to try.

    Like

  5. Eha
    November 24, 2017

    Francesca is waiting for the ‘cooking fairy’ – I have been hopelessly waiting for the ‘baking fairy’ for decades !!! Oh, Ron is a dear friend: you should see all the stuff he is baking for his Swedish-American Thanksgiving on Saturday: bet his pie dough recipe works well . . . keep reminding him 🙂 !

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 27, 2017

      I will indeed, I’m always interested in using flours made with alternate grains and seeds

      Like

  6. Chez @ Chez Moi
    November 24, 2017

    My Mum had that book and we would do the same as kids! It was a really popular book in NZ as well.

    Like

  7. anne54
    November 24, 2017

    The Women’s Weekly Birthday Cake Cook Book was a favourite of the children when I was a teacher/librarian in a primary school. They too would drool over the different cakes! I am not a cake maker, but this one looks so good that I might make an exception.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 24, 2017

      My WW Birthday book has lasted 2 generations of indecisive kids

      Like

      • anne54
        November 30, 2017

        That’s a great feat! My library copies had to be replaced family regularly!!

        Like

  8. Francesca
    November 24, 2017

    That looks so lovely. Still waiting for the cooking fairy to visit.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 24, 2017

      All in good time. It’s hard to get make into the daily swing of domestic life after such a long time away

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Megala
    November 24, 2017

    Great recipe ! Thanks for sharing !!

    Like

  10. Nice memories of past birthday cakes, I can imagine the tradition being passed on to your grandson. This cake has a great flavor profile, I’ve been avoiding wheat for several months but haven’t experimented with buckwheat. Can you substitute it straight across in volumes for wheat flour?

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 24, 2017

      Haven’t tried a recipe that doesn’t have a lot of supporting ingredients for strength and texture other than pancakes so I’ll say yes with reservations. Some buckwheat flours are quite coarse and others much more refined. I use a fine mill for cake making

      Like

  11. Ron
    November 23, 2017

    Oh yummy, this is my kind of cake. As for buckwheat (Bovetemjöl in Swedish), I’m very familiar with it. We use it her for numerous baked goods. My fav is in pie dough. Thanks for passing the recipe.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 24, 2017

      You’re welcome Ron. I’d love to see the pie dough recipe

      Like

      • Ron
        December 7, 2017

        Sorry for the delay in getting this to you. I’ve been out of the loop for a few days. Here’s the ingredients for the buckwheat pie dough. Mix as you would any pie dough. I use this as a savory pie dough, but I’ve been told one can use it in sweet pie, just add sugar.
        3 dl (1-1/4 cup) bovetemjöl (buckwheat flour)
        150 grams (10 tbsp) smör (butter) room temp
        2 tablespoons of potatismjöl (potato flour)
        1 tablespoon of cold water

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        December 7, 2017

        No problem Ron. Very grateful for the recipe share, I can’t wait to give it to try. Thank you

        Like

  12. Debi @ An Evolving Life
    November 23, 2017

    What a wonderful combination of buckwheat, hazelnuts and blueberries. I do like buckwheat flour, but you are right, it has a very strong flavour. I usually make crêpes with it (called galettes) – so very thin and the flavour isn’t overpowering so the filling (usually ham and cheese) shines. I bet a variation on this with chestnut flour might taste good, too.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 24, 2017

      Chestnut flour is a good thought although I do find it quite heavy while the buckwheat I buy seems to be ultra refined and makes a light cake. The flavour developed in strength but when I make pancakes with it for immediate consumption I can barely taste it. PS Just had walnut toast for breakfast, yum! 😀

      Like

      • Debi @ An Evolving Life
        November 24, 2017

        That’s good to know about the different textures produced by chestnut & buckwheat flours. Glad you like the whole wheat & walnut combo in your sourdough. It is yummy!

        Like

  13. Ardys
    November 23, 2017

    Sounds delicious Sandra. I’ve been off of all grains since July, except since it isn’t a grain, I can eat buckwheat. It’s a bit tricky to avoid all of them. Have dabbled with a bit of rice and corn lately and so far so good. Hope you are well.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 24, 2017

      Hi Ardys nice to hear from you. I’m really well. I can just imagine how difficult it is to cut grains from your diet completely, I depend on rice and rice products enormously, although I’m using buckwheat more and more. Having said that I’ve also reintroduced wheat and as long as it’s been slowly fermented I’m OK with it. I’ve been following your movements on IG, Your pics continue to be glorious. Wishing you good health 😘

      Liked by 1 person

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