Please Pass the Recipe

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Red Braised Brisket with Cherry Tomato Salad

Red Braised Brisket servedIn December last year I commented on Chef Mimi‘s Christmas wish list blog. She longed for Sous Vide equipment, I hoped for vouchers to buy cook books. It seems we both had our wishes granted! I chose a handsome edition of Kylie Kwong‘s “Simple Chinese Cooking Class.”

Kwong is a Sydney chef of Chinese descent, a young woman pursing her family’s heritage through cooking. She’s well known in Australia for her wonderful foodie/travel explorations of China which were broadcast on our stellar multicultural TV channel. Kylie is not your average celebrity chef. She’s passionate about her craft, her family, her ingredients. She’s committed to environmental sustainability, bio diversity and organic principles, plus she has single handedly done more to demystify authentic Chinese cooking for the home cook than any other author or chef in Australia.Red Braised Brisket book

Visiting Sydney early in the new year we were fortunate to secure a booking at Kylie’s restaurant “Billy Kwong”. We crunched on pickled vegetables and slurped at steamed oysters. We ate dim sum, steamed and fried. Followed on with simple steamed fish, a fried poached egg with chilli, and duck braised with star anise and cinnamon. Some dishes were incredibly simple, the freshness and quality of the ingredients the highlight, others an amalgamation of aromatics and richness. We rolled out the door well sated at the end of the night and buoyed by a one off dining experience, we hardly noticed the modest bill.

Red Braised Brisket with Cherry Tomato Salad I made directly as printed in the book. I made no deviations, no embellishments. I regularly poach a whole chicken in master stock during summer, but my master stock is insipid in comparison to Kylie’s version, but better suited to the delicate flavour of chicken.

This was a very simple dish to prepare. While there was the element of time involved, it was waiting time. In fact the expected waiting time tripled before I was satisfied that the brisket was soft.

So here’s my contribution to this recipe.*

The brisket was fabulous! I have to confess I’d never cooked this cut before, but it was incredibly moist, tender and flavourful, though quite rich. The acidic salad was the perfect accompaniment.

I cooked double the quantity of beef for no other reason than I had bought a whole brisket. I will make Kylie’s Crispy Orange peel beef with the remainder. Look out for the post

Two years ago, after a memorable visit to Kylie Kwong’s restaurant Billy Kwong in Sydney, I began cooking from her  “Simple Chinese Cooking Class.” There have been no disappointments, no frustrations, no double takes, just oohs and aahs of delight at the dinner table.

Our favourite recipe has been the Crispy Orange Peel Beef. It’s a recipe that requires some planning. First beef brisket has to be poached in red master stock for a lengthy period, then chilled. The fragrant beef is then broken apart, battered, deep fried and sauced. I’m salivating at the thought.

Kwong implores you at the end of the recipe to store the poaching liquid for future use. This is the third outing for this batch of stock, it’s been used twice already to poach beef brisket. The soy flavour was very strong at the end of it’s second use so I diluted 1 litre of used stock with 2 litres of filtered water for a more subtle flavour.

Poaching duck breast is incredibly simple if the stock is pre prepared, the gently cooked orange and anise infused breast meat tender, moist and delicious. It’s intended that the duck be served at room temperature, perfect to serve with a salad.

Taking the lead from the infusion, I added orange to Asian greens, the zest and flesh of a fresh navel orange and a couple of segments of pickled orange. The sauce, made with sweetened reduced poaching stock and lime juice brought the duck and salad into unison.

Two years ago, after a memorable visit to Kylie Kwong’s restaurant Billy Kwong in Sydney, I began cooking from her  “Simple Chinese Cooking Class.” There have been no disappointments, no frustrations, no double takes, just oohs and aahs of delight at the dinner table.

Our favourite recipe has been the Crispy Orange Peel Beef. It’s a recipe that requires some planning. First beef brisket has to be poached in red master stock for a lengthy period, then chilled. The fragrant beef is then broken apart, battered, deep fried and sauced. I’m salivating at the thought.

Kwong implores you at the end of the recipe to store the poaching liquid for future use. This is the third outing for this batch of stock, it’s been used twice already to poach beef brisket. The soy flavour was very strong at the end of it’s second use so I diluted 1 litre of used stock with 2 litres of filtered water for a more subtle flavour.

Poaching duck breast is incredibly simple if the stock is pre prepared, the gently cooked orange and anise infused breast meat tender, moist and delicious. It’s intended that the duck be served at room temperature, perfect to serve with a salad.

Taking the lead from the infusion, I added orange to Asian greens, the zest and flesh of a fresh navel orange and a couple of segments of pickled orange. The sauce, made with sweetened reduced poaching stock and lime juice brought the duck and salad into unison.

Red Master Stock

4 spring onions, trimmed

80 g ginger, thickly sliced,

6 cloves garlic, crushed

4 strips orange peel, all pith removed

8 star anise

4 cinnamon quills

375 mls light soy sauce

250 mls Shao xing wineRed Braised Brisket cooked

1 cup lightly packed brown sugar

1 teaspoon sesame oil

3 litres of cold water

Put all the ingredients in a large pan. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. The stock is now ready for use.

Red Braised Brisket

1 X 450g piece beef brisket

While the stock is infusing, Cut the beef into two pieces. Put the beef into a large pot, cover it with cold water then bring the water to the boil. Boil the beef for 10 minutes. This will remove any impurities. Drain the beef, rinse well, then when the stock is ready lower the beef into the stock. The beef must remain submerged so you may need to weight it down with a plate. Do not cover the pot.

Poach the beef for 1 ½ – 2 hours over a very low heat. Barely a ripple should break the surface. Test doneness with the tip of a sharp knife, you should meet no resistence. *My beef needed 5 hours before it was soft.

Remove the beef from the stock and set aside in a deep container. Strain the solids from the stock, pour it over the beef and chill overnight.

The next day, skim the fat from the surface of the stock, remove the beef from the stock, then pull the it apart into large bite sized chunks. Discard any fat and connective tissue. Put the meat into a small pot, add the hot stock and gently warm through. Remove the meat from the stock with a slotted spoon and arrange on a serving plate.

Cherry Tomato Salad

12 cherry tomatoes, quartered

1 teaspoon white sugar

½ teaspoon sea salt flakes

½ bunch coriander, leaves picked

Juice of 1 lemon

1 teaspoon fish sauce

Toss all the ingredients together and serve with the Red Braised Brisket

Serves 2 or 4 as part of a banquet

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

19 comments on “Red Braised Brisket with Cherry Tomato Salad

  1. richardmcgary
    September 8, 2013

    I love Master stocks and this Master stock sounds fabulous. This whole meal just sings.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      September 9, 2013

      It is an amazing dish, but the recipe to use up the leftovers was even better.

      Like

  2. Karen
    March 30, 2013

    Your red braised brisket sounds great as does the orange beef that you made with the leftover.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 30, 2013

      Thanks Karen, it’s a long time since I cooked directly from a recipe book so it was reassuring that the recipes were so successful. Deciding what to try next from the same book.

      Like

      • Karen
        March 30, 2013

        I’ll look forward to the next recipe.

        Like

  3. Pingback: Crispy Orange Peel Beef | Please Pass the Recipe

  4. ohlidia
    March 27, 2013

    I actually have one of Kylie’s cookbooks, although I have never made any of the recipes. This one, I will definitely make. It looks scrumptious! And I’ve been looking for an interesting brisket recipe. Thanks!

    Like

  5. marymtf
    March 26, 2013

    Which part is the brisket? Do you remember when crock pots were the in thing? That would probably be great for a slow cooking meet. I had one once, but sadly I was stupid and gave it away.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 26, 2013


      Amazing the way cooking styles go in and out of fashion. I love traditional slow braised meat from the oven, but this was a whole different kettle of fish, but equally delicious. Tomorrow you can see what I did with the leftovers…… They were sublime!

      Like

      • marymtf
        March 26, 2013

        Can’t wait!
        (that’s a passive cow that’s been divided up. 🙂 )

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        March 26, 2013

        Did I misunderstand your question?

        Like

      • marymtf
        March 26, 2013

        Not at all, I’m just teasing. I saw the picture of the cow with a diagram on its side. (I did try for a smile at the end of that sentence. Here’s another. 🙂

        Like

  6. {Main St. Cuisine}
    March 26, 2013

    How wonderful! I’m loving all of the flavors, star anise and fresh ginger.

    And, thank you so much for dropping by and “liking” my post.
    Allison

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 26, 2013

      Thanks, it was good, I enjoyed reading your blog, I thought I was following you but apparently not, but I am now!

      Like

  7. Fae's Twist & Tango
    March 26, 2013

    Beautiful post! Even through the photo I can tell how well the meat is prepared.

    Like

  8. johnnysenough hepburn
    March 25, 2013

    This sounds pretty incredible, and I bet the meat was melt-in-the-mouth delicious. Like you I’ve never cooked brisket before. And doubt I’d get a piece small enough for two portions. Actually, I’ve never seen it for sale here.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 25, 2013

      Look out for it! It’s a secondary cut, so it does require a long slow cook, but well worth the effort

      Like

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This entry was posted on March 24, 2013 by in Beef, FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Main Meals and tagged , , , , .
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