Please Pass the Recipe

from one generation to the next

Coriander and peanut “pesto”

coriander and peanut paste coriander and peanut paste

Last week at my Farmer’s Market there were huge bunches of field grown coriander for sale at a ridiculously cheap price. I needed coriander, but wondered how on earth could I use such an enormous quantity before it went slimy in the fridge. I knew I’d find a way so handed over my $2.

This coriander unlike the hydroponically grown product was vigorous, long stemmed, large leaved and intensely flavoured. I used lots of fresh leaves in the stuffing of the bánh xèo I made last week and I topped a Lucknow style chicken biryani with a large handful freshly chopped, but still I had over 1/2 bunch remaining. In a light bulb moment I thought of Coriander and Peanut paste. I dare not call it pesto as the flavours are purely Asian, but I was however inspired by pesto Genovese.

My Peanut and Coriander paste began with peanuts chopped in the food processor with a large knob of ginger and a whole red chilli. After I had added the coriander, the fun began. Recipe development is all about tasting, I love this part. The pesto needed salt so I added fish sauce, I squeezed a fresh lime and added the juice for a kick of acidity, kecap manis ( sweet Indonesian soy,) contributed umami, then a little brown sugar balanced out the flavour. I added peanut oil until I had a thick dolloping consistency. 

Fresh, lively and aromatic is the only way to describe the flavour of the paste I made. I would be a fabulous dressing for rice noodles, be wonderful with charred pork and delicious with steamed chicken. I pan fried some meaty fillets of barramundi then topped them with a generous dollop of the peanut and coriander paste.  Served it on a bed of steamed Asian greens, dinner was on the table in 15 minutes. 

This fabulous paste is set to become a regular in my kitchen. With the top surface sealed with oil, it will keep for a couple of weeks. I’m planning on serving the remainder as a dip with carrot, celery and cucumber sticks.

Coriander and Peanut Paste

20g peeled root ginger, roughly chopped

1 red chilli, roughly chopped

100g roasted salted peanuts

2 cups tightly packed washed and dried coriander leaves

2 tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon kecap manis

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 tablespoon garlic oil

2 tablespoons lime juice

1/4 cup peanut oil

Put the peanuts, chilli and ginger into the bowl of a food processor and process until finely chopped.

Add the coriander and process until finely chopped.

Add the sauces, sugar, garlic oil and lime juice and process into a paste. Taste and adjust the seasonings if necessary.

With the motor running add the peanut oil and process until the mixture is emulsified.

Spoon into a lidded container, pour a little oil over the surface to seal the paste against oxidisation and store in the fridge. Makes 1/12 cups, 375g

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

29 comments on “Coriander and peanut “pesto”

  1. thoughtsmakeu1007
    November 19, 2018

    India is famous for this 🙂 We call them ‘chutney’ and prepared at homes

    Like

  2. Sherry Mackay
    July 15, 2018

    this really sounds fabulous and so very tasty sandra! yum. great idea to use the coriander up too. i always end up with slimy bits of old herbs in my crisper, oozing out…. cheers sherry

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mae
    June 27, 2018

    You have such a flair for flavor!

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Gather and Graze
    June 23, 2018

    Lovely flavour profile in this pesto Sandra. Can imagine it would be fab with a variety of grilled meats, or scooped up as a chunky dip as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Eha
    June 22, 2018

    Oh methinks this will be copied far and wide! Fabulous recipe! And for me it is ‘pesto’ or paste . . . . . am ‘funny’ that way . . . 🙂 ! Now to go find a big bunch of coriander since two dollars would not get me anywhere here . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • ladyredspecs
      June 22, 2018

      Thanks Eha. We loved it, sometimes the cooking Gods are with you..

      Like

  6. Alina Radbone
    June 22, 2018

    What a fabulous recipe Sandra!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. chef mimi
    June 22, 2018

    I love all of the elements of this pesto! Fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Megala
    June 22, 2018

    Lovely pesto ! Like your choice of ingredients in here, will try this version as a side for my idli or dosa.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Ron
    June 22, 2018

    What an interesting flavor profile. I think it would be stupendous with noodles. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

    • ladyredspecs
      June 22, 2018

      Thanks Ron, I think you’re right. Going to give it a try for lunch today

      Like

  10. Debi @ An Evolving Life
    June 22, 2018

    Oh, lovely. I make a coriander ‘chutney’ or ‘pesto’ (semantics!) with walnuts, but just having had satay last night (as I am back in the UK), peanuts seem pretty good here, too. Must give it a try.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. fergie51
    June 21, 2018

    Bit envious about that coriander!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Darya
    June 21, 2018

    Delicious! I love coriander, and loved walking through entire fields of it in India. I could use this with/on anything. I could probably just eat it by the handful!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Darya
      June 21, 2018

      I meant *spoonful….

      Liked by 1 person

    • ladyredspecs
      June 21, 2018

      Thanks Darya It’s rare to see field grown coriander here but this is so good I’ll be buying more

      Like

      • Darya
        June 21, 2018

        Here in Northern France I like to drive to the farm to pick vegetables, and they have coriander in the field for a short while. The rest of the year it’s the hot house grown kind, still tasty… but not the same.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Rupali
    June 21, 2018

    We call it chutney 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: