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Lime marmalade pudding

Upside Down Lime Marmalade Pudding

Upside Down Lime Marmalade Pudding

Rib sticking winter puddings were a mainstay of dinners during the cold months of my childhood, a throwback to my British working class heritage. Pudding was the only incentive to eat the greens on my plate which had been boiled until grey and soggy but there was no dessert until they were gone so I doggedly swallowed them down.

My favourite winter pudding from Mum’s repertoire were those which were steamed in an earthenware basin topped with butter papers secured with string. Mum would sometimes spoon golden syrup into the basin before adding the pudding batter but I liked it best when she used homemade jam or marmalade which would run in glossy rivers down the sides of the pudding when it was turned onto a plate. The pudding needed to last a few nights so we were only served a small portion, but it was slathered in thick custard and filled us up.

To honour the memory of my childhood, I still occasionally make pudding in the winter months although it’s rare for me to actually eat it. Lucky Mr PPTR loves dessert.

A recently made batch of lime marmalade inspired me to make pudding. I only used a small number of limes but we have endless jars of marmalade even after giving 2/3 of it away. I couldn’t be bothered messing around steaming a large pudding so decided to bake them in individual serves and freeze some for another time.

A delicious finish to dinner on a cold winter’s night.

Upside Down Lime Marmalade Pudding

1/2 cup desiccated coconut

1/2 cup castor sugar

1/2 cup almond meal

1 cup spelt flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

125g melted butter, slightly cooled.

1 cup natural yoghurt

2 eggs

180ml jar lime marmalade

Preheat the oven to 160C.

Grease deep ovenproof dishes 8 X 1/2 cup.

Spoon 1 heaped dessertspoons of marmalade into each.

Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl and whisk to combine.

Combine the melted butter, eggs, yoghurt, and marmalade and whisk to thoroughly combine.

Add the wet ingredient to the dry and stir thoroughly to combine.

Divide the pudding batter into the prepared dishes.

Put the dishes onto a tray, place in the middle of the oven and baked until cooked through, about 30 minutes.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 10-15 minutes before inverting onto serving dishes,

Serve with slightly sweetened Greek yoghurt, whipped cream or custard.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

23 comments on “Lime marmalade pudding

  1. Michelle
    July 10, 2017

    Those sound so delicious! Must find some lime marmalade…

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      July 10, 2017

      English brand Roses Brand marmalade is exported worldwide, hopefully you can find a jar.

      Like

  2. yummycookbookblog
    July 8, 2017

    so yummy …

    Like

  3. Mae
    July 8, 2017

    Your pudding stories are intriguing. I’ve never yet made a steamed pudding, and it’s quite hot here. Maybe next January I’ll finally try one.

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      July 8, 2017

      These puddings are light, soft and delicious with their citrus tang, enjoy

      Like

  4. How would you freeze them? In or out of the dish? I have a pudding dish that I inherited from my grandmother and have never used. I love the look of the ceramic dish and would like to use it. I also have some Meyer lemon marmalade I made last year in the cupboard, I think it could be a substitute. I have been avoiding gluten and like you used spelt flour.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      July 8, 2017

      Hot puddings like this freeze well and reheat in the microwave. If I make individual puds I freeze them in the dish or else I divide the pudding into serves. I hope hou enjoy your marmalade puddings Liz

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Megala
    July 8, 2017

    Looks so tempting!

    Like

  6. Eha
    July 7, 2017

    Since I am the one to go for primo piatti and ‘forget’ dessert, nearly did not look! Have learnt one should never do that with you: so much here to ‘like’ and virtually nought to think of the opposite: shall try – love lime and would love to taste the rest!! Friends would love me to trot this one out . . .

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      July 8, 2017

      Thanks Eha, a hot pudding to look forward to can make winter days seem warmer

      Like

  7. Lisa @ cheergerm
    July 7, 2017

    This brings back childhood self-saucing pudding memories and it’s a beautiful winter moody foodie photo Mrs R.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      July 8, 2017

      Thanks Cheery. Hot puddings seem so old school, but they’ll have their time in the sun again.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. chefkreso
    July 6, 2017

    Yummy, sounds wonderful and the combo of lime and marmelade makes this so refreshing!

    Like

  9. katechiconi
    July 6, 2017

    This sounds yummy for cold weather, but perhaps a bit too rib sticking for our climate up here! I was lucky to have a non-English cook as my mum and never learned to hate maltreated food. My favourite hot pudding memory is apricot crumble; Ma had no steamed pudding heritage to draw on, so it took till my teens to discover the wonders of spotted dick and dead-man’s-leg!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      July 6, 2017

      My Dad never let up nagging Mum to make spotted Dick, his childhood fave, although I suspect it had a bit to do with its name. He had a very cheeky side!

      Like

      • katechiconi
        July 6, 2017

        My father used to call jam roly poly either ‘dead man’s leg’ or ‘sleeping policeman’. Not cheeky, but still pretty funny to us as children 🙂 I still adore crumble best, though, especially the crusty bits round the edges.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Francesca
    July 6, 2017

    Sounds like we had a similar ( culinary) upbringing.Nice little pud made more digestible with the use of spelt. Lovely.

    Like

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This entry was posted on July 6, 2017 by in Baking, Cooking, Desserts, Food, recipes, Warm Puddings and tagged , , .
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