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Aussie Olive Salt

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If you read my post “Indulging the Senses in Hobart” you might remember the wonderful dining experience we enjoyed at “Ethos. ” After enjoying a 64C egg served with sourdough, whipped cultured butter and olive salt I vowed to come home and master making the delicious salt.

It was a comfort thing, albeit taken to a new level. If you’ve ever enjoyed vegemite, marmite or promite smeared soldiers dipped into a soft boiled egg then you’ll know what I’m talking about. To the uninitiated, I’ll try and explain.

No one can deny that a few flakes of sea salt crumbled onto an egg enhances the flavour. The “mites” deliver that saltiness with a spade load of umami, but also with a yeasty beefiness that is very dominant. It’s not a flavour that is subtle or lends itself to marrying with anything other than plain flavours.

I began thinking about all the delicious foods which olives complement, foods that need the subtle use of salt to make them sing, potatoes, tomatoes, green beans, fish, cucumbers, eggs, onions.

An internet search delivered zero results for olive salt, so I winged it.

I learned a thing or two in the first attempt which didn’t get past drying the olives. I made a paste in the processor which made the oil run so the olives didn’t dehydrate. Take two was much, much better. I nailed it!

Fresh sweet juicy tomato drizzled with olive oil and a few grains of olive salt is sublime!

I used Mount Zero kalamata olives, Western Australian coarse lake salt and pink Murray River salt flakes.

50g pitted kalamata olives

50g coarse salt suitable for a grinder

25g salt flakes

Preheat the oven to 120C. Line a tray with baking paper.

Using a chefs knife finely mince the olives.

Spread the olives thinly on the baking paper, then put into the oven for 1 hour or until the olives are dry and crumbly.

Process the olives finely in a processor fitted with a metal blade.

Tip the loose ground dried olives into a bowl.

Scrape down any paste from the sides of the processor jug then add the coarse salt and process until it is fine. The salt will absorb any oil from the olive debris.

Tip the salt into the bowl with the processed olives then add the salt flakes.

Mix thoroughly to combine.

Store sealed in a screw top jar.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

23 comments on “Aussie Olive Salt

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  4. This is definitely on my list to make. I recently also heard about vanilla salt, which sounded interesting…that sweet salty combination. Thank you for working out the details.

    Like

  5. Margot @ Gather and Graze
    February 14, 2015

    Sounds like magic Sandra! How lovely to have a jar of this on hand for all the uses you’ve mentioned above.

    Like

  6. Michelle
    February 14, 2015

    How interesting!

    Like

  7. Fae's Twist & Tango
    February 13, 2015

    Wow, this is the type of thing I see at high scale restaurants and think what a decadent touch.

    Like

  8. I have to try this one, I bet it does add an amazing flavor and the umami factor. Thank you for working out the details and sharing it with us.

    Like

  9. Eha
    February 13, 2015

    Almost the only salt I seem to eat these days belongs to the various Asian cooking sauces so much part of my life. But this is really interesting and will be faithfully attempted . . . love Kalamata olives and have been meaning to buy the Murray River pink salt for ages to try . . .

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 13, 2015

      Salt has the ability to enhance natural flavour and should not be ignored. Recent health advice has upped the recommended salt consumption, in moderation it seems salt is OK. Olive salt delivers a delicious umami quality

      Like

  10. Glenda
    February 13, 2015

    What a great idea Sandra.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 13, 2015

      Tried it on fresh beans last night, it added a tasty twist

      Like

  11. Nancy |Plus Ate Six
    February 12, 2015

    How intriguing – I’ll bookmark this and come back to it I’m sure.

    Like

  12. cheergerm
    February 12, 2015

    Love Vegemite toast and am soooo going to make this Mrs R! I am the only olive eater in this household but all the more for me! (I am however going to sprinkle it on the Yaks beloved boiled eggs and see what happens….shhhh….)

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 12, 2015

      Mmm, it will be interesting to see how he reacts. The olive was far more pleasing than on poached eggs than truffle salt

      Liked by 1 person

  13. mrscarmichael
    February 12, 2015

    Oh yes! My personal heaven.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      February 12, 2015

      You too? Fresh tomatoes never tasted so good, olive salt is magic

      Like

  14. My Kitchen Witch
    February 12, 2015

    Oh, wow! I’ve got to make this! But, I don’t believe that it can taste like Marmite. We are a house divided over that brown gooey abomination. I bet you can tell which side I am on. But, Kalamatas, that’s a different story. They are universally liked.

    Like

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This entry was posted on February 12, 2015 by in FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Lactose Free, Pantry Essentials, Side Dishes & Salads, Spice blends and tagged , , .
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