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Salt and Pepper Pork Belly

Salt and Pepper Pork Belly

Salt and Pepper Pork Belly

My well loved wok is the cheapest I could find at the Asian stall in the local market and it’s now older than my adult kids. After carefully seasoning that carbon steel wok, I began my foray into Chinese cookery. Because an electric cooktop is not ideal for getting a wok red hot my earliest stir fried dishes were in reality, braised.

I moved up to gas cooking when I shifted house, but it wasn’t until after a major kitchen renovation just a few years back that my cheap wok, now shiny and black from use, felt real heat.

Finally I’ve been able to get tasty charred edges to the ingredients I stir fry, giving the food a typical gentle smoky flavour. It’s taken a few attempts to get a balance right with this salt and paper pork belly, but the messing around has been well worth the effort.

This is our new favourite no fuss dinner. Teamed with a oyster sauce seasoned Asian braise of wombok, bok choy, and gai lan and some rice vermicelli seasoned with garlic oil, it’s warm, mouth tingling, savoury and delicious.

Despite it’s fattiness, pork belly has a tendency to be tough when cooked quickly over a high heat. Kiwi fruit and has a natural enzyme buried within that magically softens meat fibres so after a few hours of marinating in the pureed kiwi fruit you are guaranteed juicy tender pork.

Buying a cheap wok has proved to be a blessing in disguise.

500g of boneless pork belly
1 kiwi fruit
1 teaspoon of sesame oil
1 teaspoon garlic oil
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1/2 long red chilli, sliced
3 spring onions, green part only
1 teaspoon crushed black peppercorns
1 teaspoon crushed szechuan peppercorns
1 teaspoon sea salt flakes

Cut the pork belly into pieces 1x3cm. Peel the kiwi fruit and blitz to a puree. Toss the pork in the kiwi fruit puree and chill for at least 4 hours. Drain and rinse the pork and pat it dry with paper towels.
Toss the pork in a little peanut oil.
Heat a wok, then toast the szechuan peppercorns. Crush the black and szechuan peppercorns , then add the salt flakes.
Reheat the wok, add the garlic oil then stir fry the pork in small batches until well browned and cooked through. Set each batch aside in a colander to drain off the fat.
Pour any residual fat from the wok, add the sesame oil, then sauté the chilli and spring onion until fragrant.
Return the pork belly to the pan, sprinkle over the salt and peppers, toss well to combine.
Serve garnished with extra spring onion greens.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

28 comments on “Salt and Pepper Pork Belly

  1. Pingback: Shredded Wombok Salad with Tomato Dressing | Please Pass the Recipe

  2. nicolefrancescaevans
    November 14, 2014

    Wow this is great- well written and making my mouth water! xx

    Like

  3. milkandbun
    November 4, 2014

    This looks so good, hearty and mouthwatering! I wish you was my neighbour! 😀

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 4, 2014

      It tastes much better that it looks! Wouldn’t it be fun to have a fellow food blogger as a neighbour.😃

      Like

  4. nancy @ Plus Ate Six
    November 2, 2014

    I don’t use my wok enough but how brilliant is it that your trusty wok has stood the test of time. Great tip about the kiwi fruit – heard about it for tenderising calamari but not pork before.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 3, 2014

      I figured that the enzyme action would work on any protein. The first time I cooked the pork belly in the wok it was tough but the flavour made it worth persisting. The kiwi worked a treat. You do need to rinse it off thoroughly though as remnant pieces have the tendency to quickly burn. I think my wok has reached heirloom status, thirty plus years of use and it’s black shiny surface is like teflon.

      Like

  5. Michelle
    November 1, 2014

    Perfect!

    Like

  6. My Kitchen Witch
    November 1, 2014

    Nearly missed this post – and I’m glad I didn’t. Really interested in that tip that kiwi tenderises meat. I love pork belly and usually slow cook it, but with this marinade, it looks like it can be cooked quickly. No need to plan that far ahead. Really lovely flavours you have going in this recipe. I’ve got one of those “black” woks, too, so may try this next time I get my hands on pork belly.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      November 1, 2014

      Yes kiwi fruit is a great tenderiser as is green mango and papaya. We just love this quick pork dish, and the mix of salt and peppers really makes the flavour pop.

      Like

  7. tinywhitecottage
    October 31, 2014

    Some very interesting things here Sandra. What a great tip using kiwi fruit as a tenderizer. Also love how you used three types of oil. Just the other day I was thinking how I really need to get a wok. This is a fantastic recipe and your sides sound equally wonderful.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 31, 2014

      Thanks Seana, it’s become a favourite. I use my wok at lease three times a week and have done for many years. Quick stir fried vegetables have saved the exhausted cook countless times. A cheap carbon steel wok really is best. It gets super hot, and with use, it develops a natural non stick surface.

      Like

  8. Stacy P. Fischer
    October 31, 2014

    Oh, my! May I come and eat at your house?? 🙂

    Like

  9. greenandginger
    October 31, 2014

    I’m drooling on my keyboard. That is how much your recipe has made me miss pork.

    Like

  10. Elizabeth
    October 30, 2014

    This looks delicious… I can’t wait to try it!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 30, 2014

      It is delicious Elizabeth, I’d love feedback if you do try the salt and pepper pork belly.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Elizabeth
        October 31, 2014

        Of course!!!

        Like

  11. Francesca
    October 30, 2014

    Cheap carbon steel woks are the best, especially after many years of seasoning. Modern ones, non stick varieties, or even worse, stainless steel, don’t get hot enough. While I don’t eat meat ( as you know) I am happy to cook it for the invaders and this looks great.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. cheergerm
    October 30, 2014

    What an inspired idea Mrs Recipe! I know the theory of kiwi as a tenderiser but have never actually done it. Will have to make it for my wee lads. (But dial down the pepper for the ‘hot and spicy intolerant one’). This made my mouth water.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 30, 2014

      Kiwi fruit works like magic on potentially tough protein. The kids would love this. Set some aside for the boys, then add a full hit of pepper for yourself and the Yak. It’s seriously good!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Baking With Gab
    October 30, 2014

    This looks so good!!

    Like

  14. Leah
    October 30, 2014

    Yum! Fraser swears by Kiwi for tenderising calamari but I never thought to use it on pork belly. Might have to give this recipe a try 🙂 x

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      October 30, 2014

      I think you may have eaten some at brunch in Sept. It’s delicious….xxxx

      Like

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This entry was posted on October 30, 2014 by in FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Main Meals, Pork and veal and tagged , , , .
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