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Gretchen’s Beer Mustard has bite

Gretchen's Beer Mustard

Gretchen’s Beer Mustard

I always have a cupboard crammed full of homemade condiments, jars of spicy pickles, piquant relishes and chutneys made from ripe summer fruit and vegetables at the height of the season. I make my own because I like to know exactly what they’re made with, ingredients that are a bunch of numbers scare me, but mainly I make my own because they taste much better.

Our obsession with condiments doesn’t end there though, we love mustards too. At any given time you’ll find at least four varieties in our fridge, but sadly none are home made.

A few weeks ago Gretchen @ “FeedingMy3Sons” posted a very tempting recipe for Beer Mustard. Her list of ingredients was short and already on my pantry shelf. It was just a matter of measuring a few ingredients allowing them to soak overnight, adding a few more things then whizzing the whole lot together in the food processor.

At first I was unhappy about the texture of my mixture, it hadn’t homogenised and Gretchen’s photo showed a thick and creamy mustard, so I continued to run the processor.  After just a short time the mixture began to thicken but still maintain the look of grainy mustard.

Gretchen’s Beer Mustard is so good that I won’t be replacing the commercial mustards in my fridge when the jars are empty, we now have a much better homemade product. I used Coleman’s hot English mustard powder to add a delicious sharp bite to the flavour.

So far we have relished Gretchen’s Beer Mustard with sausages, made a killer vinaigrette for green salad and used it to add a burst of flavour to a potentially dull potato salad.

I have adapted Gretchen’s recipe slightly so that it complies with the FODMAP diet

Gretchen’s Beer Mustard

250mls beer (I used O’Brien gluten free lager)

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

1/4 cup yellow mustard seeds

1/4 cup brown mustard seeds

1/4 cup dry mustard powder

2 teaspoons sea salt

2 tablespoons maple syrup

1 teaspoon grated horseradish

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Soak the yellow and brown mustard seeds together overnight in the beer and vinegar.

The next day tip the mixture into the jug of a food processor then add the mustard powder, salt maple syrup, horseradish and pepper.

Process the mixture until thick.

Pour into a sterilised jar and seal immediately

Store in the refrigerator.

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

22 comments on “Gretchen’s Beer Mustard has bite

  1. chefceaser
    July 25, 2016

    Reblogged this on Chef Ceaser and commented:
    This is very spicy.

    Like

  2. ChgoJohn
    March 29, 2016

    This recipe sounds like a winner, Sandra. I made a similar mustard and loved it, although I’ve stopped preparing it in favor of a GF and alcohol-free version of honey mustard. I’ve friends and family with dietary restrictions. Even so, nothing says that I can’t make some of yours and just not give it away. Hehehe.

    Like

  3. Sue Marquis Bishop
    March 27, 2016

    This looks so good. I know my son and husband would love it on ham and turkey sandwiches. Womenlivinglifeafter50.com

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 28, 2016

      Sue it’s a really terrific recipe, quite simple, but very very tasty

      Like

  4. Gather and Graze
    March 26, 2016

    This looks fabulous Sandra! Is it hotter than a French whole grain mustard? My Mum would put hot English mustard on our tongues if we used a rude word (only ever happened once to me!) so still a bit wary of anything that packs too much of a punch… Love the idea of making my own though. Hope you have a lovely Easter.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 26, 2016

      Thanks Margot. Yes grainy dijon is mild in comparison, it has the bite you get from hot English mustard though it’s not got the full on heat. You may be able to buy a milder powdered mustard, Keen’s perhaps. Coleman’s is about as hot as they get. If you can handle wasabi you’ll be OK with it….

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Gretchen
    March 26, 2016

    So glad you were able to make one you liked! I wonder if it’s because I used my high power blender that it emulsified quicker. It does make a great vinaigrette and good on sausages. I also like it with chicken, basically everything!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 26, 2016

      I was mindful of keeping some texture in the mix which I think made me cautious of blitzing it too much. We just love the mustard Gretchen, thanks

      Liked by 1 person

  6. chef mimi
    March 24, 2016

    This looks so good!! I’ll have to try it with sausages!

    Like

  7. Eha
    March 24, 2016

    Have not made my own mustard for quite a time and am certain none of my ‘brews’ have been as exotic in ingredients: do not remember maple syrup or horseradish but surely would like to try! Used some of ‘that’ Masterfoods stuff yesterday and was totally disenchanted, so this is on the list for the Easter break – have a good one!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 24, 2016

      Gretchen used honey rather than maple syrup and only half the quantity. You’ll never buy commercial mustard again after tasting this Eha, enjoy your Easter pottering in the kitchen

      Like

  8. Lisa @ cheergerm
    March 23, 2016

    Now that sounds killer and its GF as well! Have to add the missing bits to my shopping list. I use a lot of mustard and this looks beaut.

    Like

  9. Nancy | Plus Ate Six
    March 23, 2016

    That looks amazing! Can I check though – 1/4 cup of Colman’s English Mustard powder? That sounds like it would blow my head off – but hubby would be happy!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 23, 2016

      Yep, 1/4 cup Coleman’s is correct. The other ingredients modify the intensity dramatically, but it still has bite

      Like

      • Nancy |Plus Ate Six
        March 23, 2016

        OK I trust you. I’ll report back. I don’t have fresh horseradish but I think I will manage without it!

        Like

      • Nancy |Plus Ate Six
        March 25, 2016

        Reporting back! It packs a PUNCH and I’m so glad you said to keep going with it because I thought it was going nowhere and was about to give up. Thank you!

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        March 25, 2016

        Enjoy……

        Like

  10. Leah
    March 23, 2016

    Loved this mixed through some poached chicken and in a sandwich with lettuce and cucumber….and its going to be tested with some corned beef before the week is out. Great bite and flavour, thanks for sharing some with the Gees. xx

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      March 23, 2016

      You’re welcome! I think it would make anything taste better. I’ll have to make another batch before too long, we’re sailing through it at a very rapid rate. XX

      Liked by 1 person

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