Please Pass the Recipe

from one generation to the next

Celeriac Remoulade

Celeriac remoulade

Celeriac remoulade

We humans are a fickle lot. We complain when the weather’s cold and we whinge when it’s hot. It’s a constant source of casual conversation, and while it can be dismissed as trite, if you stop and think of the impact the ambient temperature has on our daily life, it’s a wonder we don’t talk about it more.

I won’t go into the enormously complex and far reaching issue of climate change. Suffice to say I’m a believer. I  justify my stand by quoting temperature and rainfall data released by Australia’s Bureau of Statistics at the start of each month. Maximum average temperature records are frequently being reset. April 2016 recorded the highest temperatures in Brisbane since record keeping began, each and every day reaching 30C and beyond. The month of May is a few degrees cooler, but where is winter?

The weather dictates what clothes we wear, how far to open the window, how hard we exercise and what we choose to eat and drink.

I’m suffering from acclimatization issues. I’m hankering after soup, rich braises and steamed puddings when salad is much more appropriate for this warm and steamy climate. But the local winter vegetables are flourishing, I guess we have the cooler nights to thank.

Beautiful celeriac on the greengrocer’s shelf started me thinking. The classics are hard to go past. Celeriac remoulade is an a fabulous winter salad and is a delicious accompaniment to pan fried fish.

Celeriac Remoulade

1/2 medium sized celeriac finely julienned

Juice of a lemon

dressing: 

1/4 cup mayonnaise (homemade will give you the best flavour)

1/4 cup thick cream

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon each minced parsley and fresh tarragon

2 teaspoons finely snipped chives

1 tablespoon capers, finely chopped

sea salt and pepper to taste

Peel the celeriac, then cut into fine julienne. I find the easiest way is to slice the root on the mandolin then cut the julienne with a very sharp cook’s knife.

Immediately toss the celeriac in lemon juice to prevent it discolouring.

In a small bowl whisk together the mayo, cream and mustard until smooth.

Stir through the chopped herbs and capers then season to taste with sea salt and pepper.

Drain the celeriac then toss through the dressing.

Rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before serving.

Serves 4

About ladyredspecs

I live in sunny Brisbane, Australia. My love of good food drives me as a cook, a reader, a traveller, an artist and but mostly as an eater. I cooked professionally for many years but have no formal training. Simply guided by a love of eating good food, respect for ingredients and an abhorrence of artificial additives, I cook instinctively applying the technical know how acquired by experience. I hope you enjoy what I share Sandra AKA ladyredspecs

25 comments on “Celeriac Remoulade

  1. cathyandchucky
    May 22, 2016

    I love celeriac remoulade! I’ve been after a recipe for a while and now I have yours! Thank you 😃

    Like

  2. I don’t think any person who gardens can doubt the truth of climate change. I will have tomatoes a month early this year. This is such a lovely classic salad.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 22, 2016

      It’s almost winter and I have a forest of basil, unbelievable!

      Like

  3. Gather and Graze
    May 21, 2016

    We’ve still having some beautiful daytime weather here too Sandra, which as a Canberran I certainly won’t complain about, despite the fact that it’s probably not ideal for the world as a whole. A winter salad like your celeriac remoulade sounds a wonderful way of easing into winter… I know I’d enjoy these flavours so very much!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 22, 2016

      Hope you’ve been enjoying a sunny Sunday Margot, we’ve had yet another very warm day…

      Like

  4. I bet yours is DELICIOUS. And I appreciate your mentioning Climate Change. I really believe the more we break the silence of not discussing this major major thing, the closer we will begin to be towards abatement and please God, solutions. x

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 21, 2016

      Australian politicians are just burying their heads in the sand. They’re making irresponsible decisions over and over again, the impact of which will be long and far reaching. I do what I can Annie

      Like

  5. Eha
    May 20, 2016

    Have to admit I do not get the chance to use this wonderful vegetable nearly often enough: largely because of lack of local availability. Love the taste and the look of yours and shall investigate . . . OK, since I do not use cream or mayo, there may have to be a wee change in the dressing 🙂 !

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 20, 2016

      Vinaigrette made with tarragon vinegar and a mild oil could replace the creamy mayo, but do include the herbs and capers, they really make the dish

      Like

  6. Francesca
    May 20, 2016

    This is one of my favourite salads Sandra and I thank you for putting it here where I can find it. I fell in love with it whilst travelling around France- even the cheaper supermarkets sold tubs of the stuff. Delicious.
    I must agree with you that climate change is happening at a faster rate than we all imagined. after returning from New Zealand, I found some strange things in my garden. The eggplants have reflowered- all covered in sweet purple flowers again. The tomatoes are flourishing. They dies, regrew and now are covered in large green tomatoes. The open air basil is flourishing- both Genovese and Thai. The pumpkins and Zucchinis have reflowered also. Strange.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 20, 2016

      You have to wonder how the naysayers think, where they get their info from. If every politician grew vegies perhaps they would be convinced that action was needed.

      Like

      • Francesca
        May 20, 2016

        Yes indeed. Climate change denyers obviously have their heads in the sand. A bit like flat earthers. What does it take?

        Like

  7. Glenda
    May 20, 2016

    Your salad sounds lovely Sandra. It has been quite wintery here. We have had rain since March which is very unusual. Don’t get me started on climate change.

    Like

  8. Gretchen
    May 19, 2016

    It took me time to adjust to being in the south. I grew up with such frigid winters and here it is rather mild. Thus would be a wonderful dish in our climate.

    Like

  9. Darya
    May 19, 2016

    We had hardly any winter this side of the hemisphere too (at least in Lille), but celeriac and Jerusalem artichokes are still happily coexisting with asparagus, dandelion greens, and strawberries at the market! Céleri rémoulade is such a classic here; it is sold in most delis, so people rarely make it themselves, and yet it is so delicious! It is both rich and creamy, and at the same time light and healthful. I should think about making my own next Autumn!

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 19, 2016

      I don’t need to tell you homemade always tastes best. This remoulade dressing is delicious and was a great way to use some of my rampant tarragon.

      Like

  10. katechiconi
    May 19, 2016

    Num num! I shall have to see what the local fruit & veg shops turn up. Winter root vegies up here tend to be a bit tragic, and I could murder a nice serving of your remoulade.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 19, 2016

      It was absolutely delicious Kate, a nice change from green leaves, not that I have anything against green leaves. I hope you find celeriac where you least expect it

      Like

      • katechiconi
        May 19, 2016

        Rare as hen’s teeth in the tropics, but I have hopes. I found a quince the other day, another unheard-of treat up here.

        Like

      • ladyredspecs
        May 19, 2016

        Then there is hope..

        Liked by 1 person

  11. ardysez
    May 19, 2016

    We are about to go to Darwin for a few days next week and I am already dreading the humidity and the still warm temps. Have really been enjoying our autumn weather–no complaints yet 🙂 The celeriac looks delicious but I seldom see them here. I wonder why? At least a lot of other vegetables are looking very good here at the moment. Hope your weather cools soon Sandra.

    Like

    • ladyredspecs
      May 19, 2016

      Me too Ardys. I hope Darwin’s humidity is low for you, enjoy your break…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on May 19, 2016 by in FODMAP diet, Food, Gluten Free, Side Dishes & Salads and tagged , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: